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EMC Symmetrix, 20 Years in the making

July 29th, 2009 1 comment

So next year will mark a history of Symmetrix Products within EMC, still classified as one of the most robust systems out there after 20 years of its inception. In this blog post, we will talk about some facts on Symmetrix products as it relates to its features, characteristics, Enginuity microcode versions, model numbers, year released, etc.

Also in this blog post you will see links to most of my previous posts about Symmetrix products.

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So the journey of Symmetrix systems started with Moshe Yanai (along with his team) joining EMC in late 80’s. A floating story says, the idea of a cache based disk array was initially pitched to both IBM and HP and was shot down.  EMC was predominately a mainframe memory selling company back in the late 1980’s. The Symmetrix products completely changed the direction of EMC in a decade.

Joe Tucci comes in at the end of 90’s from Unisys with a big vision. Wanted to radically change EMC. Through new acquisitions, new technologies, vision and foremost the integration of all the technologies created today’s EMC.

Symmetrix has always been the jewel of EMC. Back in the Moshe days, the engineers were treated so royally (Have heard stories about helicopter rides and lavish parties with a satellite bus waiting outside for a support call). Then comes the Data General acquisition in late 90’s that completely changed the game.

Some people within EMC were against the DG acquisition and didn’t see much value in it. While the Clariion DG backplane is what changed the Symmetrix to a Symmetrix DMX – Fiber Based Drives. Over this past decade, EMC radically changes its position and focuses on acquisitions, support, products, quality, efficiency, usability and foremost changing itself from a hardware company to an Information Solutions company focusing on software as its integral growth factor.  New acquisitions like Legato, Documentum, RSA, kept on changing the culture and the growth focus within EMC.

Then came VMware and it changed the rules of the game, EMC’s strategic move to invest into VMware paid off big time.  Then happens the 3-way partnership between VMware – EMC – Cisco, to integrate next generation products, V-Max (Symmetrix), V-Sphere and UCS are born.

Here we are in 2009, almost at the end of 20 years since the inception of the Symmetrix, the name, the product, the Enginuity code, the robust characteristics, the investment from EMC all stays committed with changing market demands.

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Jumping back into the Symmetrix, here are a few articles you might find interesting, overall talking about various models, serial numbers of the machines and importantly a post on Enginuity Operating Environment.

To read about EMC Symmetrix Enginuity Operating Environment

To read about EMC Symmetrix Serial Number naming convention,

To read about EMC Symmetrix Models in a previous blog post

To read about various EMC models based on different Platforms

To read about all EMC Clariion models since the Data General Acquisition

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Symmetrix Family 1.0

ICDA – Integrated Cache Disk Array

Released 1990 and sold through 1993

A 24GB total disk space introduced

Wow, I was in elementary school or may be middle school when this first generation Symmetrix was released….

Symmetrix 4200

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Symmetrix Family 2.0

ICDA – Integrated Cache Disk Array

Released 1991 and sold through 1994

A 36GB total disk space

Mirroring introduced

Symmetrix 4400

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Symmetrix Family 2.5

ICDA – Integrated Cache Disk Array

Released 1992 and sold through 1995

RSF capabilities added

(I actually met a guy about 2 years ago, he was one of the engineers that had worked on developing the first RSF capabilities at EMC and was very instrumental in developing the Hopkinton PSE lab)

Symmetrix 4800:

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Symmetrix Family 3.0 also called Symmetrix 3000 and 5000 Series

Released 1994 and sold through 1997

ICDA: Integrated Cache Disk Array

Includes Mainframe Support (Bus & Tag)

Global Cache introduced

1GB total Cache

NDU – Microcode

SRDF introduced

Supports Mainframe and open systems both

Enginuity microcode 50xx, 51xx

Symmetrix 3100: Open systems support, half height cabinet, 5.25 inch drives

Symmetrix 5100: Mainframe support, half height cabinet, 5.25 inch drives

Symmetrix 3200: Open Systems support, single cabinet, 5.25 inch drives

Symmetrix 5200: Mainframe support, single cabinet, 5.25 inch drives

Symmetrix 3500: Open Systems support, triple cabinet, 5.25 inch drives

Symmetrix 5500: Mainframe support, triple cabinet, 5.25 inch drives

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Symmetrix Family 4.0 also called Symmetrix 3000 and 5000 Series

Released 1997 and sold through 2000

RAID XP introduced

3.5 Inch drive size introduced

On triple cabinet systems 5.25 inch drives used

Supports Mainframe and Open Systems both

Timefinder, Powerpath, Ultra SCSI support

Enginuity microcode 5265.xx.xx, 5266.xx.xx

Symmetrix 3330: Open Systems Support, half height cabinet, 32 drives, 3.5 inch drives

Symmetrix 5330: Mainframe Support, half height cabinet, 32 drives, 3.5 inch drives

Symmetrix 3430: Open Systems Support, single frame, 96 drives, 3.5 inch drives

Symmetrix 5430: Mainframe Support, single frame, 96 drives, 3.5 inch drives

Symmetrix 3700: Open Systems Support, triple cabinet, 128 drives, 5.25 inch drives

Symmetrix 5700: Mainframe Support, triple cabinet, 128 drives, 5.25 inch drives

To read about EMC Symmetrix Hardware Components

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Symmetrix Family 4.8 also called Symmetrix 3000 and 5000 Series

Released 1998 and sold through 2001

Symmetrix Optimizer Introduced

Best hardware so far: least outages, least problems and least failures (not sure if EMC will agree to it, most customers do)

3.5 inch drives used with all models

Enginuity microcode 5265.xx.xx, 5266.xx.xx, 5267.xx.xx

Symmetrix 3630: Open Systems support, half height cabinet, 32 drives

Symmetrix 5630: Mainframe support, half height cabinet, 32 drives

Symmetrix 3830: Open Systems support, single cabinet, 96 drives

Symmetrix 5830: Mainframe support, single cabinet, 96 drives

Symmetrix 3930: Open Systems support, triple cabinet, 256 drives

Symmetrix 5930: Mainframe support, triple cabinet, 256 drives

Models sold as 3630-18, 3630-36, 3630-50, 5630-18, 5630-36, 5630-50,3830-36, 3830-50, 3830-73, 5830-36, 5830-50, 5830-73, 3930-36, 3930-50, 3930-73, 5930-36, 5930-50, 5930-73 (the last two digits indicate the drives installed in the frame)

To read about EMC Symmetrix Hardware Components

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Symmetrix Family 5.0 also called Symmetrix 8000 Series

[ 3000 (open sytems) + 5000 (mainframe) = 8000 (support for both) ]

Supports Open Systems and Mainframe without BUS and TAG through ESCON

Released 2000 and sold through 2003

181GB Disk introduced

Enginuity microcode 5567.xx.xx, 5568.xx.xx

Symmetrix 8130: Slim cabinet, 48 drives

Symmetrix 8430: Single cabinet, 96 drives

Symmetrix 8730: Triple cabinet, 384 drives

Some models sold as 8430-36, 8430-73, 8430-181 or 8730-36, 8730-73, 8730-181 (the last two digits indicate the drives installed in the frame)

To read about EMC Symmetrix Hardware Components

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Symmetrix Family 5.5 LVD also called Symmetrix 8000 Series

Released 2001 and sold through 2004

LVD: Low Voltage Disk Introduced

146GB LVD drive introduced

Ultra SCSI drives cannot be used with the LVD frame

Mainframe optimized machines introduced

4 Slice directors introduced with ESCON and FICON

FICON introduced

Enginuity microcode 5567.xx.xx, 5568.xx.xx

Symmetrix 8230: Slim cabinet, 48 drives, (rebranded 8130, non lvd frame)

Symmetrix 8530: Single cabinet, 96 drives, (rebranded 8430, non lvd frame)

Symmetrix 8830: Triple cabinet, 384 drives, (rebranded 8730, non lvd frame)

Symmetrix 8230 LVD: LVD frame, slim cabinet, 48 LVD drives

Symmetrix 8530 LVD: LVD frame, single cabinet, 96 LVD drives

Symmetrix 8830 LVD: LVD frame, triple cabinet, 384 LVD drives

Symmetrix z-8530: LVD frame, Single cabinet, 96 drives, optimized for mainframes

Symmetrix z-8830: LVD frame, Triple cabinet, 384 drives, optimized for mainframe

Some models sold as 8530-36, 8530-73, 8530-146, 8530-181 or 8830-36, 8830-73, 8830-146, 8830-181 (the last two digits indicate the drives installed in the frame)

To read about EMC Symmetrix Hardware Components

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Symmetrix DMX or also called Symmetrix Family 6.0

Released Feb 2003 and sold through 2006

Direct Matrix Architecture (Data General Backplane) introduced

DMX800 was the first DMX system introduced

4 Slice directors introduced

RAID 5 introduced after being introduced on DMX-3

First generation with common DA / FA hardware

Introduction of modular power

Enginuity Microcode 5669.xx.xx, 5670.xx.xx, 5671.xx.xx

Symmetrix DMX800: Single cabinet, DAE based concept for drives, 96 drives (I swear, a customer told me, they have ghost like issues with their DMX800)

Symmetrix DMX1000: Single cabinet, 18 drives per loop, 144 drives total

Symmetrix DMX1000-P: Single cabinet, 9 drives per loop, 144 drives total, P= Performance System

Symmetrix DMX2000: Dual cabinet, modular power, 18 drives per loop, 288 drives

Symmetrix DMX2000-P: Dual cabinet, modular power, 9 drives per loop, 288 drives, P=Performance System

Symmetrix DMX3000-3: Triple cabinet, modular power, 18 drives per loop, 3 phase power, 576 drives

To read about EMC Symmetrix DMX Hardware components

To read about EMC Symmetrix DMX models and major differences

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Symmetrix DMX2 or also called Symmetrix Family 6.5

Released Feb 2004 and sold through 2007

Double the processing using DMX2

DMX and DMX2 frames are same, only directors from DMX must be changed to upgrade to DMX2, reboot of entire systems required with this upgrade

RAID 5 introduced after being introduced on DMX-3

64GB memory introduced

4 Slice Directors

Enginuity Microcode 5669.xx.xx, 5670.xx.xx, 5671.xx.xx

Symmetrix DMX801: 2nd generation DMX, Single cabinet, DAE based concept for drives, 96 drives, FC SPE 2 (I swear, a customer told me, they have ghost like issues with their DMX800)

Symmetrix DMX1000-M2: 2nd generation DMX, Single cabinet, 18 drives per loop, 144 drives

Symmetrix DMX1000-P2: 2nd generation DMX, Single cabinet, 9 drives per loop, 144 drives, P=Performance System

Symmetrix DMX2000-M2: 2nd generation DMX, Dual cabinet, 18 drives per loop, 288 drives

Symmetrix DMX2000-P2: 2nd generation DMX, Dual cabinet, 9 drives per loop, 288 drives, P=Performance System

Symmetrix DMX2000-M2-3: 2nd generation DMX, Dual cabinet, 18 drives per loop, 288 drives, 3 Phase power

Symmetrix DMX2000-P2-3: 2nd generation DMX, Dual cabinet, 9 drives per loop, 288 drives, P=Performance System, 3 Phase power

Symmetrix DMX3000-M2-3: 2nd generation DMX, Triple cabinet, 18 drives per loop, 576 drives, 3 Phase power

To read about EMC DMX Symmetrix Hardware components

To read about EMC Symmetrix DMX models and major differences

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Symmetrix DMX-3 or also called Symmetrix 7.0

Released July 2005 and still being sold

8 Slice directors

1920 disk (RPQ ‘ed to 2400 drives)

DAE based concept introduced

Symmetrix Priority Controls

RAID 5 introduced and then implemented on older DMX, DMX-2

Virtual LUN technology

SRDF enhancements

Concept of vaulting introduced

Enginuity microcode 5771.xx.xx, 5772.xx.xx

Symmetrix DMX-3 950: System Cabinet, Storage Bay x 2, 360 drives max, Modular Power, 3 Phase power

Symmetrix DMX-3: System Cabinet, Storage Bay x 8 (Expandable), 1920 drives max, RPQ’ed to 2400 drives, 3 Phase power

To read about differences between EMC Symmetrix DMX3 and DMX4 platforms

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Symmetrix DMX-4 or also called Symmetrix 7.0

Released July 2007 and still being sold

Virtual provisioning

Flash Drives

FC / SATA drives

RAID 6 introduced

SRDF enhancements

Total Cache: 512 GB

Total Storage: 1 PB

Largest drive supported 1TB SATA drive

Flash drives 73GB, 146GB later now support for 200GB and 400GB released

1920 drives max (RPQ’ed to 2400 drives)

Enginuity microcode 5772.xx.xx, 5773.xx.xx

Symmetrix DMX-4 950: System Cabinet, Storage Bay x 2, 360 drives max, Modular Power, 3 Phase power

Symmetrix DMX-4: System Cabinet, Storage Bay x 8 (Expandable), 1920 drives max, RPQ’ed to 2400 drives, Modular power, 3 Phase Power

Some models sold as DMX-4 1500, DMX-4 2500, DMX-4 3500 and DMX-4 4500

To read about a blog post on EMC Symmetrix: DMX4 Components

To read about differences between EMC Symmetrix DMX3 and DMX4 platforms

To read about different drives types supported on EMC Symmetrix DMX4 Platform

To read about differences between EMC Symmetrix DMX4 and V-Max Systems

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Symmetrix V-Max

(Released April 2009)

Enginuity Microcode 5874.xxx.xxx

Total number of drives supported: 2400

Total Cache: 1 TB mirrored (512GB usable)

Total Storage: 2 PB

All features on the V-Max have been discussed earlier on the blog post linked below

Symmetrix V-Max SE: Single System Bay, SE=Single Engine, Storage Bay x 2, 360 drives max, cannot be expanded to a full blown 8 engine system if purchased as a SE, 3 Phase power, Modular Power

Symmetrix V-Max: System Cabinet, Storage Bay x 10, 2400 drives max, modular power, 3 phase power

To read about differences between EMC Symmetrix DMX4 and V-Max Systems

To read about different drives types supported on EMC Symmetrix V-Max Platforms

To read all about the EMC Symmetrix V-Max Platform

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I could have easily added total memory capacity per frame, total number of dedicated DA/DAF slots, total slots, total universal slots, total memory slots, but then I didn’t know information on some of the old systems and didn’t want to be incorrect on them.

Hope you have enjoyed reading this post, with a bit of history related to the Symmetrix platform. I am pretty positive, as of today you will not find this consolidated information on any blog or the manufacturers website.

I really wish, EMC decided to open blogging to some Symmetrix, Clariion, Celerra, Centera specialist that support these systems on a day to day basis, the information that could come out from those guys could be phenomenal. Barry Burke writes a lot of stuff, but again a lot of FUD from him against IBM and HDS, its great reading him, but only a controlled amount of technical information comes from him.

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EMC Symmetrix V-Max: Supported drive types

June 25th, 2009 No comments

With the release of EMC Symmetrix V-Max systems, EMC introduced higher density EFD’s (Enterprise Flash Disks) than being supported on its predecessor, the EMC Symmetrix DMX-4.

Below are some stats related to the supported drive types on a Symmetrix V-Max system with 5874.123.104 microcode.

Possibly with introduction of FAST (Fully Automated Storage Tiering) later in the year we will see an upgrade to the microcode family for the V-Max systems to 5976, also with that expect a much denser EFD support.

In the mean time we should atleast see some additional support for VSphere 4.0 (Vmware) in 2009 with 5875 family of microcode. With that we should see sort of a new concept of Federation with Symmetrix V-Max Systems where EMC might give some clues on how the 8 engine systems might be expanded into either 16 or 32 engine systems. A nice blog post by @edsai on the breathing data site. http://breathingdata.com/?p=20

The following size drives types are supported with Symmetrix V-Max Systems at the current microcode 5874: 146 GB, 200 GB, 300 GB, 400 GB, 450 GB, 1000 GB.


Drive Types, Rotational Speed and Formatted Capacity


146 GB FC Drive

Drive Speed: 15K

Open Systems Format Cap: 143.53 GB

Mainframe Format Cap: 139.34 GB

300 GB FC Drive

Drive Speed: 15K

Open Systems Format Cap: 288.19 GB

Mainframe Format Cap: 279.77 GB

400 GB FC Drive

Drive Speed: 10K

Open Systems Format Cap: 393.84 GB

Mainframe Format Cap: 382.32 GB

450 GB FC Drive

Drive Speed: 15K

Open Systems Format Cap: 432.29 GB

Mainframe Format Cap: 419.64 GB

1000 GB SATA II Drive

Drive Speed: 7.2K

Open Systems Format Cap: 984.81 GB

Mainframe Format Cap: 956.02 GB

200 GB EFD

Drive Speed: Not Applicable

Open Systems Format Cap: 196.97 GB

Mainframe Format Cap: 191.21 GB

400 GB EFD

Drive Speed: Not Applicable

Open Systems Format Cap: 393.84 GB

Mainframe Format Cap: 382.33 GB

Support for 73GB and 146GB EFD’s have been dropped with the Symmetrix V-Max Systems, they will still be supported with the Symmetrix DMX-4 Systems which in addition to 73 GB and 146GB also supports 200GB and 400GB EFD’s.

Storage Resource Analysis (SRA): Part 7

April 27th, 2009 No comments

TO SUBSCRIBE TO STORAGENERVE BLOG

 

The Technical Case

Continuing the blog posts on Storage Resource Analysis (SRA), this post focuses on the technical case on why analysis of your storage platforms is important and how it might help you discover inconsistencies in storage environments.

 

To read the previous blog posts on Storage Resource Analysis (SRA)

Storage Resource Analysis (SRA): Part 1: Storage Resource Analysis and Storage Economics

Storage Resource Analysis (SRA): Part 2: The IT – Storage World of 2009

Storage Resource Analysis (SRA): Part 3: The IT – Storage Budgets of 2009

Storage Resource Analysis (SRA): Part 4: Some Fundamental Questions

Storage Resource Analysis (SRA): Part 5: Facts about your Data

Storage Resource Analysis (SRA): Part 6: Inconsistencies in Storage Environments

Storage Resource Analysis (SRA): Part 7: The Technical Case

Storage Resource Analysis (SRA): Part 8: The Business Case

Storage Resource Analysis (SRA): Part 9: The End Result

 

From a technology standpoint, it’s very important to understand what Storage Analysis will do and how it might overall bring more value, efficiencies and utilization in your environments. To talk about a few technical issues it might help you understand are..

1)      How much headroom (total possible growth) we have in our storage environment (drilldown array, lun)

2)      How much reclaimable storage do we have in our environment (drilldown array, lun)

3)      How much immediate deployable storage do we have in our storage environment (drilldown where)

4)      Can we predict capacity planning and future growth

5)      The information obtained above should be as of today, not something you started working about 3 months ago.

6)      In large volatile storage environments, things are changing every second, it hard to keep a track of your storage configurations, relationships, headroom, capacity, reclamation.

7)      Are you maintaining spreadsheets or access databases to keep a track of your applications, application owners, wwn, servers, zones, etc. You need to consider something soon.

8 )      Do you enforce Tiering in our environment, how much data do we have based on each tier.

9)      Do we follow ILM approach, how much data needs to be migrated over to different tiers based on business needs and rules (we should see FAST later this year that should automate the process on V-Max)

10)   Do we have any configuration issues in our environments that have caused major storage outages (single path host, multipath host with only one path active, LUN masking issues, zoning issues, BCV issues, other configuration issues)

11)   How many times in the past 6 months have we had a major application outage and what caused it (how much penalties did we pay for those – OPEX dollars).

12)   If we follow any compliance (SEC, Sarbanes Oxley, HIPPA, etc), is our data complaint in terms of replication, policies, etc

13)   Do we have any manual processes for charge backs and bill backs, if so, what can we do to automate it.

14)   Do we know how the LUN’s in our environment are setup and the relationships it has with LUN’s on other arrays in terms of replication, BCV, Snaps, Clones, SRDF, etc.

15)   Do we know how the storage is growing in our environment: Trend Analysis

16)   What sorts of report are available to you for the analysis you are performing.

17)   Be careful to not just obtain a nice topology diagram of what is connected where, but being able to drill down real time to obtain LUN level details is important.

18)   With any storage analysis product, how much work is involved, How much training, How much training related cost, ease of use, number of users, detailed drill down, how easy would it be to analyze your environment, etc needs to be understood before the project starts.

19)   Do we have a Storage Economics Practice setup within our Storage environment to consistently increase our utilization, efficiency, reclamation and lower our outages & cost.

 

Experience

We had a conference call with a potential customer late last week about our storage offerings. This is a large insurance company that has acquired quite a few different companies over the past 5 years and are growing and currently going through data center consolidation projects.

During the call, we asked what they were doing for reclamation and other storage economics. To my surprise, they answered, we had purchased an OEM based Operational Software about 5 years ago and we didn’t like it, there are different people within the organization that still use it, but it’s not giving us the required results we want, more or less its used for alerts.

Now we have just purchased and going through an implementation of another OEM’s Operational Software for data reclamation, analysis and monitoring. The customer goes ahead and says, we have been trying to implement this software within our environment for the past 4 months now.

The point I am trying to make is, whatever these deployments are, they have to be easy enough, cost effective, not time and resource consuming, not consume your CAPEX dollars and not spend you OPEX dollars (training, implementation, outages).

It has to be light weight, easily deployable, should yield results in a short duration of time (hours or days rather than months), but still should be able to analyze your environment at a very detailed level.

 

What are you using today to manage your several hundred TB or an enormously large double digit PB storage estate?

The Who’s Who of Storage Twitters

March 11th, 2009 2 comments

Twitter…Twitter…..Twitter…..that is all we hear these days….Time Magazine has been following it and recently published a big article on Twitter.

Many of our co-bloggers, co-workers, friends, family and now our better half’s are following us on twitter these days…..

Brian Henderson has an interesting blog article he just posted as I started writing this article. Here is the link.

There was a good post by David Spencer: Seven People to Follow on Twitter, here is the link.

On this post I do not want to talk about the advantages, disadvantages, etc, but rather focus this towards a list of Storage Centric Folks that are using twitter today.

This post is a continuation of my previous blog posts about various Storage Bloggers in the Blogosphere and about LinkedIn and the Storage/Virtualization Groups.

Twitter these days seems to be one of those social media outlets where Storage folks are spending a lot of time and energy to learn and push some new products and technologies. Here is a link to my previous post on Twitter (A micro blogging platform)

A blog post from Stephen Foskett from Dec 2008 and another one from Christopher Kusek from Feb 2009 discussing some storage folks using Twitter…


To follow me on Twitter http://www.twitter.com/storagenerve
There are some additional links that are pretty kool to get more information about your twittering habits.

To register on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com

TwitterSheep: http://twittersheep.com/ (This is funny, you should read it)

TwitterCounter: http://twittercounter.com (Good way to get your twitter stats)

TwitterFeed: http://twitterfeed.com (To Automate your blog post for Twitter)

TwitterGrader: http://twitter.grader.com/ (Get your twitter Grade, see your twits practices)

Twitter-Friends: http://twitter-friends.com/(Get a 360 about you and your twitter connections)

Twitter-Search: http://www.twittertroll.com/(To search topics on twitter, this is good search engine)

Twitter Wheel: http://www.tweetwheel.com (To see your tweet wheel, very interesting….)

Twitoria: http://twitoria.com/ (Great site to find your inactive twitter friends)

Twesents: http://twesents.com/ (Send a Twe to a friend….)

TwitterGroups: http://twittgroups.com/(Dont forget to check out the storage groups on TwittGroups)

Here are the Storage Twitters…….enjoy and add to your list..

Twitter Name Associations Name Notes
3parfarley 3Par Marc Farley aka. Storagerap, interesting twits..
abhinav_joshi NetApp Abhinav Joshi Rare twits, Technical
Akorri Akorri Lisa Crewe official
AnueSystems Anue official
astorrs Andrew Storrs
bensons Savvis Benson Schliesser
bgracely NetApp
bhendu EMC Brian Henderson Windows/EMC
bjgreenberg Brain Greenberg
BlueArc BlueArc official
bwahacker Mitch Haile Virtualization
bwhyte IBM Barry Whyte SVC Technology
Callero Calle
carlig HDS Carli seems to be the boss….
centernetworks Center Networks official
Chris_Mellor The Register Chris Mellor Interesting twits…
chrisgeb NetApp Chris Gebhardt
chrisjones77 Chris Jones You want to recover your data
chrismevans Chris Evans aka The Storage Architect
ChuckHollis EMC Chuck Hollis Recently joined and disappered
CimaMan John Alday
ckranz NetApp Chris Kranz
clifftrapp
Compellent Compellent Compellent official
contemplatingIT HDS (50%) Tony Asaro
ctnco EMC Edward Newman Active, good twits…
CXI NetApp Christopher Kusek he is up all night twitting…..
damienstevens Damien Stevens Cloud Com links every evenings
DaveGraham EMC Dave Graham Very Active, good twits…..
DavidKSpencer EMC David Spencer Happy Guy….
dell_storage Dell Dell Storage official
DellServerGeek Dell Scott Hanson Active twits…
dexin Could Computing
EdSai Ed Saipetch
embedded_guy Emulex Chris Hoffman
EMC EMC EMC Corp official
eric_sherrill Eric Sherill
esignoretti Enrico Signoretti
GestaltIT Gestalt IT Never miss
GlassHouse_Tech GlassHouse Rare Twits
gminks EMC Gina Minks
Gregorydwhite Dell Gregory White
HDSCorp HDS Hitachi Data Systems every new blog post, HDS twits.
IanHF Active user with broken toe???
ibmstorage IBM Raj Subramaniam
irsanw EMC Irsan Widarto
jdowson EMC Jim Dowson CTO, Global Services
JoleneHajj Emulex Jolene Hajj Emulex PR….
kccowan EMC Ken Cowan
Kostadis_Netapp NetApp Kostadis Roussos Opinionated….
LenDevanna EMC Len Devanna
Matt Povey HDS Matt Povey English guy in Australia….
menielsen Michael Nielsen
Moesch NetApp Michael Moeschler
mozy Mozy Mozy Online Backup official
mozybackup Mozy Mozy Backup official
NetApp NetApp NetApp official
nigelpoulton Nigel Poulton Technology….
onStorage NetApp Eric Pederson
Openrsm Openrsm OpenRSM Cloud official
optimizestorage Ocarina Networks official
Padmasree Cisco Padmasree Warrior CTO, Cisco Systems
PariseauTT Search Storage Beth Pariseau Good Tech Post
Polly Pearson EMC Polly Pearson EMC HR…
PSteege Seagate Pete Steege
qlogic Qlogic Qlogic official
SamMoulton NetApp Samantha Moulton
scott_lowe Scott Lowe Virtualization
scummins EMC Sean Cummins
SFoskett Stephen Foskett Active twitter…
sharney / Scott Harney Scott Harney
simon_elisha Simon Elisha
sshottan CTO, Storage Company
StarWindSAN StarWind StarWind official
SteveTodd EMC Steve Todd Opens up twitter during lunch
storageanarchy EMC Barry Burke MAN behind today’ Symmetrix
Storagebod Martin Glassborow Active twitter…
storageio Greg Schultz I see Green….
StorageMonkeys Tim Masters
StorageNerve Devang Panchigar Myself…..
storageswiss George Crump Active twitter…
storagewarrior
Storagezilla EMC Mark Twomey Active user he doesn’t sleep either
Stu EMC Stuart Miniman
sunmicrosystems SUN Sun official
sunshinemug Ocarina Networks great blog post these days….
tatat / tyler yuniarto Tyler Yuniarto
techmute Matt Davis
TheSANTechBlog Dell Steven Schwartz where are you now??
timbo_baggins IBM Tim Biller I am starting a band soon…
tracker619 EMC Mike Fishman CTO, Backup Platforms
valb00 NetApp Val The NetApp Agenda….
Vaughn_Stewart NetApp Vaughn Stewart
VicenteM EMC
VirtuallyNetapp NetApp Jack McLeod
virtualtacit Joe Kelly Recover Point…
virtualTodd Vmware Todd Muirhead The Guy who runs and runs….
vramaswamy HDS Vijay Ramaswamy
Wandster EMC Rich Wand
zorian StarWind Zorian Rotenberg CEO, StarWind

emulex Emulex     Official

cingulus Emulex                           VP Corp Marketing

msarrel Technologist
If you are an enterprise storage blogger or twitter, and your name is not on the list, please email me or DM me on Twitter @storagenerve, will get you added to the list. At all times want to keep this listed updated.