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EMC Symmetrix, 20 Years in the making

July 29th, 2009 1 comment

So next year will mark a history of Symmetrix Products within EMC, still classified as one of the most robust systems out there after 20 years of its inception. In this blog post, we will talk about some facts on Symmetrix products as it relates to its features, characteristics, Enginuity microcode versions, model numbers, year released, etc.

Also in this blog post you will see links to most of my previous posts about Symmetrix products.

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So the journey of Symmetrix systems started with Moshe Yanai (along with his team) joining EMC in late 80’s. A floating story says, the idea of a cache based disk array was initially pitched to both IBM and HP and was shot down.  EMC was predominately a mainframe memory selling company back in the late 1980’s. The Symmetrix products completely changed the direction of EMC in a decade.

Joe Tucci comes in at the end of 90’s from Unisys with a big vision. Wanted to radically change EMC. Through new acquisitions, new technologies, vision and foremost the integration of all the technologies created today’s EMC.

Symmetrix has always been the jewel of EMC. Back in the Moshe days, the engineers were treated so royally (Have heard stories about helicopter rides and lavish parties with a satellite bus waiting outside for a support call). Then comes the Data General acquisition in late 90’s that completely changed the game.

Some people within EMC were against the DG acquisition and didn’t see much value in it. While the Clariion DG backplane is what changed the Symmetrix to a Symmetrix DMX – Fiber Based Drives. Over this past decade, EMC radically changes its position and focuses on acquisitions, support, products, quality, efficiency, usability and foremost changing itself from a hardware company to an Information Solutions company focusing on software as its integral growth factor.  New acquisitions like Legato, Documentum, RSA, kept on changing the culture and the growth focus within EMC.

Then came VMware and it changed the rules of the game, EMC’s strategic move to invest into VMware paid off big time.  Then happens the 3-way partnership between VMware – EMC – Cisco, to integrate next generation products, V-Max (Symmetrix), V-Sphere and UCS are born.

Here we are in 2009, almost at the end of 20 years since the inception of the Symmetrix, the name, the product, the Enginuity code, the robust characteristics, the investment from EMC all stays committed with changing market demands.

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Jumping back into the Symmetrix, here are a few articles you might find interesting, overall talking about various models, serial numbers of the machines and importantly a post on Enginuity Operating Environment.

To read about EMC Symmetrix Enginuity Operating Environment

To read about EMC Symmetrix Serial Number naming convention,

To read about EMC Symmetrix Models in a previous blog post

To read about various EMC models based on different Platforms

To read about all EMC Clariion models since the Data General Acquisition

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Symmetrix Family 1.0

ICDA – Integrated Cache Disk Array

Released 1990 and sold through 1993

A 24GB total disk space introduced

Wow, I was in elementary school or may be middle school when this first generation Symmetrix was released….

Symmetrix 4200

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Symmetrix Family 2.0

ICDA – Integrated Cache Disk Array

Released 1991 and sold through 1994

A 36GB total disk space

Mirroring introduced

Symmetrix 4400

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Symmetrix Family 2.5

ICDA – Integrated Cache Disk Array

Released 1992 and sold through 1995

RSF capabilities added

(I actually met a guy about 2 years ago, he was one of the engineers that had worked on developing the first RSF capabilities at EMC and was very instrumental in developing the Hopkinton PSE lab)

Symmetrix 4800:

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Symmetrix Family 3.0 also called Symmetrix 3000 and 5000 Series

Released 1994 and sold through 1997

ICDA: Integrated Cache Disk Array

Includes Mainframe Support (Bus & Tag)

Global Cache introduced

1GB total Cache

NDU – Microcode

SRDF introduced

Supports Mainframe and open systems both

Enginuity microcode 50xx, 51xx

Symmetrix 3100: Open systems support, half height cabinet, 5.25 inch drives

Symmetrix 5100: Mainframe support, half height cabinet, 5.25 inch drives

Symmetrix 3200: Open Systems support, single cabinet, 5.25 inch drives

Symmetrix 5200: Mainframe support, single cabinet, 5.25 inch drives

Symmetrix 3500: Open Systems support, triple cabinet, 5.25 inch drives

Symmetrix 5500: Mainframe support, triple cabinet, 5.25 inch drives

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Symmetrix Family 4.0 also called Symmetrix 3000 and 5000 Series

Released 1997 and sold through 2000

RAID XP introduced

3.5 Inch drive size introduced

On triple cabinet systems 5.25 inch drives used

Supports Mainframe and Open Systems both

Timefinder, Powerpath, Ultra SCSI support

Enginuity microcode 5265.xx.xx, 5266.xx.xx

Symmetrix 3330: Open Systems Support, half height cabinet, 32 drives, 3.5 inch drives

Symmetrix 5330: Mainframe Support, half height cabinet, 32 drives, 3.5 inch drives

Symmetrix 3430: Open Systems Support, single frame, 96 drives, 3.5 inch drives

Symmetrix 5430: Mainframe Support, single frame, 96 drives, 3.5 inch drives

Symmetrix 3700: Open Systems Support, triple cabinet, 128 drives, 5.25 inch drives

Symmetrix 5700: Mainframe Support, triple cabinet, 128 drives, 5.25 inch drives

To read about EMC Symmetrix Hardware Components

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Symmetrix Family 4.8 also called Symmetrix 3000 and 5000 Series

Released 1998 and sold through 2001

Symmetrix Optimizer Introduced

Best hardware so far: least outages, least problems and least failures (not sure if EMC will agree to it, most customers do)

3.5 inch drives used with all models

Enginuity microcode 5265.xx.xx, 5266.xx.xx, 5267.xx.xx

Symmetrix 3630: Open Systems support, half height cabinet, 32 drives

Symmetrix 5630: Mainframe support, half height cabinet, 32 drives

Symmetrix 3830: Open Systems support, single cabinet, 96 drives

Symmetrix 5830: Mainframe support, single cabinet, 96 drives

Symmetrix 3930: Open Systems support, triple cabinet, 256 drives

Symmetrix 5930: Mainframe support, triple cabinet, 256 drives

Models sold as 3630-18, 3630-36, 3630-50, 5630-18, 5630-36, 5630-50,3830-36, 3830-50, 3830-73, 5830-36, 5830-50, 5830-73, 3930-36, 3930-50, 3930-73, 5930-36, 5930-50, 5930-73 (the last two digits indicate the drives installed in the frame)

To read about EMC Symmetrix Hardware Components

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Symmetrix Family 5.0 also called Symmetrix 8000 Series

[ 3000 (open sytems) + 5000 (mainframe) = 8000 (support for both) ]

Supports Open Systems and Mainframe without BUS and TAG through ESCON

Released 2000 and sold through 2003

181GB Disk introduced

Enginuity microcode 5567.xx.xx, 5568.xx.xx

Symmetrix 8130: Slim cabinet, 48 drives

Symmetrix 8430: Single cabinet, 96 drives

Symmetrix 8730: Triple cabinet, 384 drives

Some models sold as 8430-36, 8430-73, 8430-181 or 8730-36, 8730-73, 8730-181 (the last two digits indicate the drives installed in the frame)

To read about EMC Symmetrix Hardware Components

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Symmetrix Family 5.5 LVD also called Symmetrix 8000 Series

Released 2001 and sold through 2004

LVD: Low Voltage Disk Introduced

146GB LVD drive introduced

Ultra SCSI drives cannot be used with the LVD frame

Mainframe optimized machines introduced

4 Slice directors introduced with ESCON and FICON

FICON introduced

Enginuity microcode 5567.xx.xx, 5568.xx.xx

Symmetrix 8230: Slim cabinet, 48 drives, (rebranded 8130, non lvd frame)

Symmetrix 8530: Single cabinet, 96 drives, (rebranded 8430, non lvd frame)

Symmetrix 8830: Triple cabinet, 384 drives, (rebranded 8730, non lvd frame)

Symmetrix 8230 LVD: LVD frame, slim cabinet, 48 LVD drives

Symmetrix 8530 LVD: LVD frame, single cabinet, 96 LVD drives

Symmetrix 8830 LVD: LVD frame, triple cabinet, 384 LVD drives

Symmetrix z-8530: LVD frame, Single cabinet, 96 drives, optimized for mainframes

Symmetrix z-8830: LVD frame, Triple cabinet, 384 drives, optimized for mainframe

Some models sold as 8530-36, 8530-73, 8530-146, 8530-181 or 8830-36, 8830-73, 8830-146, 8830-181 (the last two digits indicate the drives installed in the frame)

To read about EMC Symmetrix Hardware Components

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Symmetrix DMX or also called Symmetrix Family 6.0

Released Feb 2003 and sold through 2006

Direct Matrix Architecture (Data General Backplane) introduced

DMX800 was the first DMX system introduced

4 Slice directors introduced

RAID 5 introduced after being introduced on DMX-3

First generation with common DA / FA hardware

Introduction of modular power

Enginuity Microcode 5669.xx.xx, 5670.xx.xx, 5671.xx.xx

Symmetrix DMX800: Single cabinet, DAE based concept for drives, 96 drives (I swear, a customer told me, they have ghost like issues with their DMX800)

Symmetrix DMX1000: Single cabinet, 18 drives per loop, 144 drives total

Symmetrix DMX1000-P: Single cabinet, 9 drives per loop, 144 drives total, P= Performance System

Symmetrix DMX2000: Dual cabinet, modular power, 18 drives per loop, 288 drives

Symmetrix DMX2000-P: Dual cabinet, modular power, 9 drives per loop, 288 drives, P=Performance System

Symmetrix DMX3000-3: Triple cabinet, modular power, 18 drives per loop, 3 phase power, 576 drives

To read about EMC Symmetrix DMX Hardware components

To read about EMC Symmetrix DMX models and major differences

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Symmetrix DMX2 or also called Symmetrix Family 6.5

Released Feb 2004 and sold through 2007

Double the processing using DMX2

DMX and DMX2 frames are same, only directors from DMX must be changed to upgrade to DMX2, reboot of entire systems required with this upgrade

RAID 5 introduced after being introduced on DMX-3

64GB memory introduced

4 Slice Directors

Enginuity Microcode 5669.xx.xx, 5670.xx.xx, 5671.xx.xx

Symmetrix DMX801: 2nd generation DMX, Single cabinet, DAE based concept for drives, 96 drives, FC SPE 2 (I swear, a customer told me, they have ghost like issues with their DMX800)

Symmetrix DMX1000-M2: 2nd generation DMX, Single cabinet, 18 drives per loop, 144 drives

Symmetrix DMX1000-P2: 2nd generation DMX, Single cabinet, 9 drives per loop, 144 drives, P=Performance System

Symmetrix DMX2000-M2: 2nd generation DMX, Dual cabinet, 18 drives per loop, 288 drives

Symmetrix DMX2000-P2: 2nd generation DMX, Dual cabinet, 9 drives per loop, 288 drives, P=Performance System

Symmetrix DMX2000-M2-3: 2nd generation DMX, Dual cabinet, 18 drives per loop, 288 drives, 3 Phase power

Symmetrix DMX2000-P2-3: 2nd generation DMX, Dual cabinet, 9 drives per loop, 288 drives, P=Performance System, 3 Phase power

Symmetrix DMX3000-M2-3: 2nd generation DMX, Triple cabinet, 18 drives per loop, 576 drives, 3 Phase power

To read about EMC DMX Symmetrix Hardware components

To read about EMC Symmetrix DMX models and major differences

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Symmetrix DMX-3 or also called Symmetrix 7.0

Released July 2005 and still being sold

8 Slice directors

1920 disk (RPQ ‘ed to 2400 drives)

DAE based concept introduced

Symmetrix Priority Controls

RAID 5 introduced and then implemented on older DMX, DMX-2

Virtual LUN technology

SRDF enhancements

Concept of vaulting introduced

Enginuity microcode 5771.xx.xx, 5772.xx.xx

Symmetrix DMX-3 950: System Cabinet, Storage Bay x 2, 360 drives max, Modular Power, 3 Phase power

Symmetrix DMX-3: System Cabinet, Storage Bay x 8 (Expandable), 1920 drives max, RPQ’ed to 2400 drives, 3 Phase power

To read about differences between EMC Symmetrix DMX3 and DMX4 platforms

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Symmetrix DMX-4 or also called Symmetrix 7.0

Released July 2007 and still being sold

Virtual provisioning

Flash Drives

FC / SATA drives

RAID 6 introduced

SRDF enhancements

Total Cache: 512 GB

Total Storage: 1 PB

Largest drive supported 1TB SATA drive

Flash drives 73GB, 146GB later now support for 200GB and 400GB released

1920 drives max (RPQ’ed to 2400 drives)

Enginuity microcode 5772.xx.xx, 5773.xx.xx

Symmetrix DMX-4 950: System Cabinet, Storage Bay x 2, 360 drives max, Modular Power, 3 Phase power

Symmetrix DMX-4: System Cabinet, Storage Bay x 8 (Expandable), 1920 drives max, RPQ’ed to 2400 drives, Modular power, 3 Phase Power

Some models sold as DMX-4 1500, DMX-4 2500, DMX-4 3500 and DMX-4 4500

To read about a blog post on EMC Symmetrix: DMX4 Components

To read about differences between EMC Symmetrix DMX3 and DMX4 platforms

To read about different drives types supported on EMC Symmetrix DMX4 Platform

To read about differences between EMC Symmetrix DMX4 and V-Max Systems

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Symmetrix V-Max

(Released April 2009)

Enginuity Microcode 5874.xxx.xxx

Total number of drives supported: 2400

Total Cache: 1 TB mirrored (512GB usable)

Total Storage: 2 PB

All features on the V-Max have been discussed earlier on the blog post linked below

Symmetrix V-Max SE: Single System Bay, SE=Single Engine, Storage Bay x 2, 360 drives max, cannot be expanded to a full blown 8 engine system if purchased as a SE, 3 Phase power, Modular Power

Symmetrix V-Max: System Cabinet, Storage Bay x 10, 2400 drives max, modular power, 3 phase power

To read about differences between EMC Symmetrix DMX4 and V-Max Systems

To read about different drives types supported on EMC Symmetrix V-Max Platforms

To read all about the EMC Symmetrix V-Max Platform

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I could have easily added total memory capacity per frame, total number of dedicated DA/DAF slots, total slots, total universal slots, total memory slots, but then I didn’t know information on some of the old systems and didn’t want to be incorrect on them.

Hope you have enjoyed reading this post, with a bit of history related to the Symmetrix platform. I am pretty positive, as of today you will not find this consolidated information on any blog or the manufacturers website.

I really wish, EMC decided to open blogging to some Symmetrix, Clariion, Celerra, Centera specialist that support these systems on a day to day basis, the information that could come out from those guys could be phenomenal. Barry Burke writes a lot of stuff, but again a lot of FUD from him against IBM and HDS, its great reading him, but only a controlled amount of technical information comes from him.

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EMC Symmetrix V-Max: Enginuity 5874

June 26th, 2009 1 comment

EMC Symmetrix V-Max systems were introduced back in the month of April 2009. With this new generation of Symmetrix came a new name V-Max and a new Enginuity family of microcode 5874.
To read about Symmetrix on StorageNerve Blog

http://storagenerve.com/tag/symmetrix

To read about V-Max systems on StorageNerve Blog

http://storagenerve.com/tag/v-max/

With this family of microcode 5874: there are 7 major areas of enhancements as listed below.

Base enhancements

Management Interfaces enhancements

SRDF functionality changes

Timefinder Performance enhancements

Open Replicator Support and enhancements

Virtualization enhancements

Also EMC introduced SMC 7.0 (Symmetrix Management Console) for managing this generation of Symmetrix. Read about the SMC 7.0 post below.

http://storagenerve.com/2009/05/06/emc-symmetrix-management-console-symmetrix-v-max-systems/

With Enginuity family 5874 you also need solutions enabler 7.0

The initial Enginuity was release 5874.121.102, a month into the release we saw a new emulation and SP release 5874.122.103 and the latest release as of 18th of June 2009 is 5874.123.104. With these new emulation and SP releases, there aren’t any new features added to the microcode rather just some patches and fixes related to the maintenance, DU/DL and environmentals.

Based on some initial list of enhancements by EMC and then a few we heard at EMC World 2009, to sum up, here are all of those.

RVA: Raid Virtual Architecture:

With Enginuity 5874 EMC introduced the concept of single mirror positions. Normally it has always been challenging to reduce the mirror positions since they cap out at 4. With enhancements to mirror positions related to SRDF environments and RAID 5 (3D + 1P, 7D +1P) / RAID 6  (6D+2P, 14D+2P) / RAID 1 devices, now it will open doors to some further migration and data movement opportunities related to SRDF and RAID devices.

Large Volume Support:

With this version of Enginuity, we will see max volume size of 240GB for open systems and 223GB for mainframe systems with 512 hypers per drive. The maximum drive size supported on Symmetrix V-Max system is 1TB SATA II drives. The maximum drive size supported for EFD on a Symmetrix V-Max system is 400GB.

Dynamic Provisioning:

Enhancements related to SRDF and BCV device attributes will overall improve efficiency during configuration management. Will provide methods and means for faster provisioning.

Concurrent Configuration Changes:

Enhancements to concurrent configuration changes will allow the customer and customer engineer to perform through Service Processor and through Solutions enabler certain procedures and changes that can be all combined and executed through a single script rather than running them in a series of changes.

Service Processor IP Interface:

All Service Processors attached to the Symmetrix V-Max systems will have Symmetrix Management Console 7.0 on it, that will allow customers to login and perform Symmetrix related management functions. Also the service processor will have capabilities to be managed through the customer’s current IP (network) environment. Symmetrix Management Console will have to be licensed and purchased from EMC for V-Max systems. The prior versions of SMC were free. SMC will now have capabilities to be opened through a web interface.

SRDF Enhancements:

With introduction of RAID 5 and RAID 6 devices on the previous generation of Symmetrix (DMX-4), now the V-Max offers a 300% better performance with TImefinder and other SRDF layered apps to make the process very efficient and resilient.

Enhanced Virtual LUN Technology:

Enhancements related to Virtual LUN Technology will allow customers to non-disruptively perform changes to the location of disk either physically or logically and further simplify the process of migration on various systems.

Virtual Provisioning:

Virtual Provisioning can now be pushed to RAID 5 and RAID 6 devices that were restrictive in the previous versions of Symmetrix.

Autoprovisioning Groups:

Using Autoprovisiong groups, customers will now be able to perform device masking by creating host initiators, front-end ports and storage volumes. There was an EMC Challenge at EMC World 2009 Symmetrix corner for auto provisioning the symms with a minimum number of clicks. Autoprovisioning groups are supported through Symmetrix Management Console.

So the above are the highlights of EMC Symmetrix V-Max Enginuity 5874. As new version of the microcode is released later in the year stay plugged in for more info.

EMC Symmetrix DMX device type, COVD: Cache Only Virtual Device

June 25th, 2009 No comments

On Twitter this morning we (@chrismevans@basraayman@davegraham) were discussing device type: COVD (Cache Only Virtual Device) on EMC Symmetrix DMX platform.

So here is some information on Cache Only Virtual Devices. I do not have a very clear picture on the overall operation of this device type, but from a high level it can be summed up as following based on it characteristics.

Starting with microcode 5670 on EMC Symmetrix DMX Systems, EMC introduced COVD (device types). We have seen instances of COVD on 5671, 5771 and 5772 microcodes, really unknown if they exist on EMC Symmetrix V-Max systems at this point.

Here are some highlights on COVD:

  • Even though COVD’s were introduced on the 5670 microcode, recommendation is to upgrade to 5671 on the R2 side of SRDF/A before implementing COVD’s.
  • Used with SRDF/A technology for caching data on R2 side.
  • Symconfigure will not allow (block) you to change SRDF/A group on R2 side for COVD devices. You will need a BIN File change for this process by the Customer Engineer.
  • COVD is a Virtual Device but does end up taking two device numbers within your list of Symmetrix device numbers (I believe 8192 device numbers are available on the early DMX’s).
  • If you are using COVD, your configured capacity might show more than your Raw Capacity in ECC and StorageScope.
  • COVD’s cannot be snapped using TImefinder
  • COVD’s can only be created and destroyed by BIN File (not through SYMCLI)
  • COVD is only found on R2 side of SRDF/A
  • Cache is used as part of creating the COVD
  • COVD’s are used in pairs, one is used for active SRDF/A cycle and 1 is used for inactive SRDF/A cycle
  • No Data is stored on COVD, used practically for caching
  • Primarily introduction of COVD was to reduce the write pending limits with SRDF/A

Haven’t really seen a lot of customers using COVD (device types). But sometimes during storage analysis of customer meta data reveals these device types since it is assigned a device number.

EMC Symmetrix / DMX SRDF Setup

January 26th, 2009 9 comments


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This blog talks about setting up basic SRDF related functionality on the Symmetrix / DMX machines using EMC Solutions Enabler Symcli.

For this setup, let’s have two different host, our local host will be R1 (Source) volumes and our remote host will be R2 (Target) volumes.

A mix of R1 and R2 volumes can reside on the same symmetrix, in short you can configure SRDF between two Symmetrix machines to act as if one was local and other was remote and vice versa.


Step 1

Create SYMCLI Device Groups. Each group can have one or more Symmetrix devices specified in it.

SYMCLI device group information (name of the group, type, members, and any associations) are maintained in the SYMAPI database.

In the following we will create a device group that includes two SRDF volumes.

SRDF operations can be performed from the local host that has access to the source volumes or the remote host that has access to the target volumes. Therefore, both hosts should have device groups defined.

Complete the following steps on both the local and remote hosts.

a) Identify the SRDF source and target volumes available to your assigned hosts. Execute the following commands on both the local and remote hosts.

# symrdf list pd (execute on both local and remote hosts)

or

# syminq

b) To view all the RDF volumes configured in the Symmetrix use the following

# symrdf list dev

c) Display a synopsis of the symdg command and reference it in the following steps.

# symdg –h

d) List all device groups that are currently defined.

# symdg list

e) On the local host, create a device group of the type of RDF1. On the remote host, create a device group of the type RDF2.

# symdg –type RDF1 create newsrcdg (on local host)

# symdg –type RDF2 create newtgtdg (on remote host)

f) Verify that your device group was added to the SYMAPI database on both the local and remote hosts.

# symdg list

g) Add your two devices to your device group using the symld command. Again use (–h) for a synopsis of the command syntax.

On local host:

# symld –h

# symld –g newsrcdg add dev ###

or

# symld –g newsrcdg add pd Physicaldrive#

On remote host:

# symld –g newtgtdg add dev ###

or

# symld –g newtgtdg add pd Physicaldrive#

h) Using the syminq command, identify the gatekeeper devices. Determine if it is currently defined in the SYMAPI database, if not, define it, and associate it with your device group.

On local host:

# syminq

# symgate list (Check SYMAPI)

# symgate define pd Physicaldrive# (to define)

# symgate -g newsrcdg associate pd Physicaldrive# (to associate)

On remote host:

# syminq

# symgate list (Check SYMAPI)

# symgate define pd Physicaldrive# (to define)

# symgate -g newtgtdg associate pd Physicaldrive# (to associate)

i) Display your device groups. The output is verbose so pipe it to more.

On local host:

# symdg show newsrcdg |more

On remote host:

# symdg show newtgtdg | more

j) Display a synopsis of the symld command.

# symld -h

k) Rename DEV001 to NEWVOL1

On local host:

# symld –g newsrcdg rename DEV001 NEWVOL1

On remote host:

# symld –g newtgtdg rename DEV001 NEWVOL1

l) Display the device group on both the local and remote hosts.

On local host:

# symdg show newsrcdg |more

On remote host:

# symdg show newtgtdg | more

Step 2

Use the SYMCLI to display the status of the SRDF volumes in your device group.

a) If on the local host, check the status of your SRDF volumes using the following command:

# symrdf -g newsrcdg query

Step 3

Set the default device group. You can use the “Environmental Variables” option.

# set SYMCLI_DG=newsrcdg (on the local host)

# set SYMCLI_DG=newtgtdg (on the remote host)

a) Check the SYMCLI environment.

# symcli –def (on both the local and remote hosts)

b) Test to see if the SYMCLI_DG environment variable is working properly by performing a “query” without specifying the device group.

# symrdf query (on both the local and remote hosts)

Step 4

Changing Operational mode. The operational mode for a device or group of devices can be set dynamically with the symrdf set mode command.

a) On the local host, change the mode of operation for one of your SRDF volumes to enable semi-synchronous operations. Verify results and change back to synchronous mode.

# symrdf set mode semi NEWVOL1

# symrdf query

# symrdf set mode sync NEWVOL1

# symrdf query

b) Change mode of operation to enable adaptive copy-disk mode for all devices in the device group. Verify that the mode change occurred and then disable adaptive copy.

# symrdf set mode acp disk

# symrdf query

# symrdf set mode acp off

# symrdf query


Step 5

Check the communications link between the local and remote Symmetrix.

a) From the local host, verify that the remote Symmetrix is “alive”. If the host is attached to multiple Symmetrix, you may have to specify the Symmetrix Serial Number (SSN) through the –sid option.

# symrdf ping [ -sid xx ] (xx=last two digits of the remote SSN)

b) From the local host, display the status of the Remote Link Directors.

# symcfg –RA all list

c) From the local host, display the activity on the Remote Link Directors.

# symstat -RA all –i 10 –c 2

Step 6

Create a partition on each disk, format the partition and assign a filesystem to the partition. Add data on the R1 volumes defined in the newsrcdg device group.

Step 7

Suspend RDF Link and add data to filesystem. In this step we will suspend the SRDF link, add data to the filesystem and check for invalid tracks.

a) Check that the R1 and R2 volumes are fully synchronized.

# symrdf query

b) Suspend the link between the source and target volumes.

# symrdf suspend

c) Check link status.

# symrdf query

d) Add data to the filesystems.

e) Check for invalid tracks using the following command:

# symrdf query

f) Invalid tracks can also be displayed using the symdev show command. Execute the following command on one of the devices in your device group. Look at the Mirror set information.

On the local host:

# symdev show ###

g) From the local host, resume the link and monitor invalid tracks.

# symrdf resume

# symrdf query

In the next upcoming blogs, we will setup some flags for SRDF and Director types, etc.

Happy SRDF’ing!!!!!