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HP Blades and Infrastructure Software TechDay 2010

February 22nd, 2010 1 comment

So back to the new years (2010) events now….

HP Blades and Infrastructure Software Tech Day 2010 is being hosted in Houston, TX on the 25th and 26th of Feb, 2010. An invitation only event focused around various HP related Compute, Virtualization and Networking Technologies (Converged Infrastructure) and possibly some new product announcements.

The Tech Day was initially launched by HP last year particularly by the Storage Group and now has become quite famous within the industry to invite bloggers and independent social media voices to these events and give them briefings about products and technologies.

These briefings include Company Executives providing a vision into the technology, possibly the next gen or future roadmaps without any NDA’s, live demos of the product by engineering teams, hands on lab, inside tour of the labs, how today’s technology helps solve business problems, marketing pitches and a deep dive session on some selected technologies.

I have been fortunate to been invited again to this event. Though the topics of discussion are not exactly disclosed yet, but stay tuned for the entire coverage of this event on this blog and also on the twitter stream.

The twitter hashcode for this event is #hpbladesday

So far here are a few Industry experts that are attending this event (in random order).

Rich Brambley: http://vmetc.com

Greg Knieriemen: Infosmack Podcast

Stephen Foskett: http://blog.fosketts.net/

Chris Evans: http://thestoragearchitect.com

Simon Seagrave: http://techhead.co.uk

John Obeto: http://absolutelywindows.com

Frank Owen: http://techvirtuoso.com

Kevin Houston: http://bladesmadesimple.com

Martin Macleod: http://www.bladewatch.com/

Calvin Zito from HP will be attending the event; you can catch Calvin’s HP Storage Blog here

http://www.communities.hp.com/online/blogs/datastorage/default.aspx

Here is the link to previous HPTECHDAY blog posts on the StorageNerve blog.

http://storagenerve.com/events/hp-techday-2009/

To follow all #hpbladesday invitees on twitter, here is a list put together by Greg Knieriemen

http://twitter.com/Knieriemen/hp-blades-day

This event is being organized by IVY Worldwide.

At this event, it will be good to understand HP’s current vision and roadmap with its Blades technology and with all the converged products.

Though I am not officially required to write about these technology briefings and deepdive sessions, if I find something interesting, you will see it in form of a technology discussion at this blog.

Twitter #hpbladesday

Cheers
@storagenerve

GestaltIT TechfieldDay 2009: Post 1

November 9th, 2009 No comments

We are coming very close to the GestaltIT Techfieldday 2009 being organized in San Francisco, CA and San Jose, CA on the 12th and 13th of Nov 2009.

Over the next few days, you will see a ton of new blog posts coming out from various different sources, including invited bloggers and possibly some vendor posts. I do promise to provide a very extensive coverage of this event. I am pretty sure if you are on twitter you saw the fireworks of #hptechday 2009 that happened about a month and a half ago, I believe this event will cause similar if not more fireworks on twitter with #techfieldday 2009.

This is a very unique event, I am pretty sure, there has been nothing similar to what is being planned ever planned before in relation to using Social Media. An event organized by GestaltIT that will take independent bloggers to vendors to understand the storage and virtualization technology offered by these vendors. The value something an event like this creates is phenomenal and could leave great impact on customer, consumers & user that read through social media for research of a given technology. A ton of credit goes to Stephen Foskett for organizing this event. I would absolutely call this is brainchild. I still remember the day he called me about this event; he was in NYC having lunch and the next thing I know he is talking about this and asked if I can attend.

Though I will give Calvin Zito from HP a lot of credit for the kind of event that HP organized and invited the bloggers, they did set the standard and expectations from an event like this. The results were amazing.

Though I am a pretty new face in social media, only been around on blog and twitter for about a year now, this will be my 5th event in 2009. First it started with EMC World 2009, then VMworld 2009, then HP Techday 2009, then EMC Forums NYC 2009 and now GestaltIT Techfieldday 2009.

This post starts at No. 1 for the GestaltIT TechFieldDay event but I promise by the time this event is done and the postmortem is finished, we will at least have 10 new blog post. I will be republishing some of those on GestaltIT.com, but some of them will only be exclusive on the Storagenerve.com blog.

To follow the updates from this event on StorageNerve.com site look for the Logo

GestaltITTechFieldDay On Twitter, follow me @storagenerve

Twitter hashtag: #TechFieldDay

Also I will be creating a TweetGrid on the StorageNerve.com site on Tuesday with #techfieldday for a minute-by-minute update on the event.

Stay tuned…

Comments always welcome

Note: If you find this blog post interesting and would like to read more from the author, please subscribe to this blog. http://storagenerve.com/feed

Year One and going

November 3rd, 2009 No comments

Today marks the 1st anniversary of the StorageNerve Blog.

I never thought blogging would come so far. Lots of persistence, reading, writing, vision, sacrifice of those nice weekends all combined together is the end result.

Major topics over the past year

The StorageNerve blog is primarily focused on Storage Technology. Major discussions have been around EMC Clariion, Symmetrix, Celerra, layered Software, management, RAID-6 technology as it relates to EMC, HDS, NetApp, HP, lots of writing on Symmetrix V-Max and a 9 series blog post on Storage Resource Analysis as it fits within Storage Economics. A total of post about 140 blog post.

Core Values

The Core value of StorageNerve blog has been around technology. Also this blog favors technology and not manufacturers.

StorageNerve Brand

So over the past year, with tons of writing, reading it has been a great learning experience for me, which does help promote the StorageNerve Brand. As life progresses, people move on to new positions and new challenges and I sure would like to position this brand in a similar way.

Why do you Blog?

Well this is a question I get asked a lot from my co-workers, other people I know in the industry.

Truly and Truly, I have enjoyed every moment of it and that is why the commitment for future post stays very high.

The StorageNerve brand and blog has allowed me to build new industry contacts, meet new people, accessibility to tons of industry experts and analyst, contacts with fellow bloggers, manufacturers, the list is non ending. In this past year, through the StorageNerve blog, I have been able to talk one on one with atleast 5 different CEO’s of Storage related companies. Quite a few one on one meetings with industry leaders and technologist with similar background.

Then came along GestaltIT.com and it is a great pleasure to work with folks highly recognized in the industry to collaborate on post and understand views related to other technologies. Then later this year I was approached by Huliq.com to write news articles for them as it relates to Storage Technology, though I haven’t written anything for them yet, I do plan to try something out.

Another opportunity came along to have one on one sessions with investment firms.  Focus of these sessions are towards Storage, Storage products, Storage technologies, Storage manufacturers and a Storage vision, that they take back to their end users.

I am truly waiting for the next big opportunity to happen through the StorageNerve blog.

The Stats

I know this means nothing, but being a technology-focused blog, I see tons of advantages as it relates to storage keywords searches.

The hits on the StorageNerve Blog have surpassed my expectations; I never thought it would go so far in the first year.

Topics over the next year

So year 2 is important rather very important. You will see some HDS technology posts, NetApp technology posts and Emerging technology posts. Users will get to read some post on Virtualization, Cloud Computing and Storage Economics.

Conclusion

Hope you enjoyed reading StorageNerve blog over the past year. Hope you keep reading it for the next year and find the articles interesting.

On the StorageNerve blog, I have been posting new articles for the past 5 days and for the next 5 days to come. Stay tuned for the next blog post to see some additional changes and some invitations forthcoming.

Please feel free to leave comments or email me at devang @ storagenerve.com

Cheers, @storagenerve

EMC Symmetrix, 20 Years in the making

July 29th, 2009 1 comment

So next year will mark a history of Symmetrix Products within EMC, still classified as one of the most robust systems out there after 20 years of its inception. In this blog post, we will talk about some facts on Symmetrix products as it relates to its features, characteristics, Enginuity microcode versions, model numbers, year released, etc.

Also in this blog post you will see links to most of my previous posts about Symmetrix products.

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So the journey of Symmetrix systems started with Moshe Yanai (along with his team) joining EMC in late 80’s. A floating story says, the idea of a cache based disk array was initially pitched to both IBM and HP and was shot down.  EMC was predominately a mainframe memory selling company back in the late 1980’s. The Symmetrix products completely changed the direction of EMC in a decade.

Joe Tucci comes in at the end of 90’s from Unisys with a big vision. Wanted to radically change EMC. Through new acquisitions, new technologies, vision and foremost the integration of all the technologies created today’s EMC.

Symmetrix has always been the jewel of EMC. Back in the Moshe days, the engineers were treated so royally (Have heard stories about helicopter rides and lavish parties with a satellite bus waiting outside for a support call). Then comes the Data General acquisition in late 90’s that completely changed the game.

Some people within EMC were against the DG acquisition and didn’t see much value in it. While the Clariion DG backplane is what changed the Symmetrix to a Symmetrix DMX – Fiber Based Drives. Over this past decade, EMC radically changes its position and focuses on acquisitions, support, products, quality, efficiency, usability and foremost changing itself from a hardware company to an Information Solutions company focusing on software as its integral growth factor.  New acquisitions like Legato, Documentum, RSA, kept on changing the culture and the growth focus within EMC.

Then came VMware and it changed the rules of the game, EMC’s strategic move to invest into VMware paid off big time.  Then happens the 3-way partnership between VMware – EMC – Cisco, to integrate next generation products, V-Max (Symmetrix), V-Sphere and UCS are born.

Here we are in 2009, almost at the end of 20 years since the inception of the Symmetrix, the name, the product, the Enginuity code, the robust characteristics, the investment from EMC all stays committed with changing market demands.

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Jumping back into the Symmetrix, here are a few articles you might find interesting, overall talking about various models, serial numbers of the machines and importantly a post on Enginuity Operating Environment.

To read about EMC Symmetrix Enginuity Operating Environment

To read about EMC Symmetrix Serial Number naming convention,

To read about EMC Symmetrix Models in a previous blog post

To read about various EMC models based on different Platforms

To read about all EMC Clariion models since the Data General Acquisition

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Symmetrix Family 1.0

ICDA – Integrated Cache Disk Array

Released 1990 and sold through 1993

A 24GB total disk space introduced

Wow, I was in elementary school or may be middle school when this first generation Symmetrix was released….

Symmetrix 4200

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Symmetrix Family 2.0

ICDA – Integrated Cache Disk Array

Released 1991 and sold through 1994

A 36GB total disk space

Mirroring introduced

Symmetrix 4400

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Symmetrix Family 2.5

ICDA – Integrated Cache Disk Array

Released 1992 and sold through 1995

RSF capabilities added

(I actually met a guy about 2 years ago, he was one of the engineers that had worked on developing the first RSF capabilities at EMC and was very instrumental in developing the Hopkinton PSE lab)

Symmetrix 4800:

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Symmetrix Family 3.0 also called Symmetrix 3000 and 5000 Series

Released 1994 and sold through 1997

ICDA: Integrated Cache Disk Array

Includes Mainframe Support (Bus & Tag)

Global Cache introduced

1GB total Cache

NDU – Microcode

SRDF introduced

Supports Mainframe and open systems both

Enginuity microcode 50xx, 51xx

Symmetrix 3100: Open systems support, half height cabinet, 5.25 inch drives

Symmetrix 5100: Mainframe support, half height cabinet, 5.25 inch drives

Symmetrix 3200: Open Systems support, single cabinet, 5.25 inch drives

Symmetrix 5200: Mainframe support, single cabinet, 5.25 inch drives

Symmetrix 3500: Open Systems support, triple cabinet, 5.25 inch drives

Symmetrix 5500: Mainframe support, triple cabinet, 5.25 inch drives

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Symmetrix Family 4.0 also called Symmetrix 3000 and 5000 Series

Released 1997 and sold through 2000

RAID XP introduced

3.5 Inch drive size introduced

On triple cabinet systems 5.25 inch drives used

Supports Mainframe and Open Systems both

Timefinder, Powerpath, Ultra SCSI support

Enginuity microcode 5265.xx.xx, 5266.xx.xx

Symmetrix 3330: Open Systems Support, half height cabinet, 32 drives, 3.5 inch drives

Symmetrix 5330: Mainframe Support, half height cabinet, 32 drives, 3.5 inch drives

Symmetrix 3430: Open Systems Support, single frame, 96 drives, 3.5 inch drives

Symmetrix 5430: Mainframe Support, single frame, 96 drives, 3.5 inch drives

Symmetrix 3700: Open Systems Support, triple cabinet, 128 drives, 5.25 inch drives

Symmetrix 5700: Mainframe Support, triple cabinet, 128 drives, 5.25 inch drives

To read about EMC Symmetrix Hardware Components

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Symmetrix Family 4.8 also called Symmetrix 3000 and 5000 Series

Released 1998 and sold through 2001

Symmetrix Optimizer Introduced

Best hardware so far: least outages, least problems and least failures (not sure if EMC will agree to it, most customers do)

3.5 inch drives used with all models

Enginuity microcode 5265.xx.xx, 5266.xx.xx, 5267.xx.xx

Symmetrix 3630: Open Systems support, half height cabinet, 32 drives

Symmetrix 5630: Mainframe support, half height cabinet, 32 drives

Symmetrix 3830: Open Systems support, single cabinet, 96 drives

Symmetrix 5830: Mainframe support, single cabinet, 96 drives

Symmetrix 3930: Open Systems support, triple cabinet, 256 drives

Symmetrix 5930: Mainframe support, triple cabinet, 256 drives

Models sold as 3630-18, 3630-36, 3630-50, 5630-18, 5630-36, 5630-50,3830-36, 3830-50, 3830-73, 5830-36, 5830-50, 5830-73, 3930-36, 3930-50, 3930-73, 5930-36, 5930-50, 5930-73 (the last two digits indicate the drives installed in the frame)

To read about EMC Symmetrix Hardware Components

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Symmetrix Family 5.0 also called Symmetrix 8000 Series

[ 3000 (open sytems) + 5000 (mainframe) = 8000 (support for both) ]

Supports Open Systems and Mainframe without BUS and TAG through ESCON

Released 2000 and sold through 2003

181GB Disk introduced

Enginuity microcode 5567.xx.xx, 5568.xx.xx

Symmetrix 8130: Slim cabinet, 48 drives

Symmetrix 8430: Single cabinet, 96 drives

Symmetrix 8730: Triple cabinet, 384 drives

Some models sold as 8430-36, 8430-73, 8430-181 or 8730-36, 8730-73, 8730-181 (the last two digits indicate the drives installed in the frame)

To read about EMC Symmetrix Hardware Components

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Symmetrix Family 5.5 LVD also called Symmetrix 8000 Series

Released 2001 and sold through 2004

LVD: Low Voltage Disk Introduced

146GB LVD drive introduced

Ultra SCSI drives cannot be used with the LVD frame

Mainframe optimized machines introduced

4 Slice directors introduced with ESCON and FICON

FICON introduced

Enginuity microcode 5567.xx.xx, 5568.xx.xx

Symmetrix 8230: Slim cabinet, 48 drives, (rebranded 8130, non lvd frame)

Symmetrix 8530: Single cabinet, 96 drives, (rebranded 8430, non lvd frame)

Symmetrix 8830: Triple cabinet, 384 drives, (rebranded 8730, non lvd frame)

Symmetrix 8230 LVD: LVD frame, slim cabinet, 48 LVD drives

Symmetrix 8530 LVD: LVD frame, single cabinet, 96 LVD drives

Symmetrix 8830 LVD: LVD frame, triple cabinet, 384 LVD drives

Symmetrix z-8530: LVD frame, Single cabinet, 96 drives, optimized for mainframes

Symmetrix z-8830: LVD frame, Triple cabinet, 384 drives, optimized for mainframe

Some models sold as 8530-36, 8530-73, 8530-146, 8530-181 or 8830-36, 8830-73, 8830-146, 8830-181 (the last two digits indicate the drives installed in the frame)

To read about EMC Symmetrix Hardware Components

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Symmetrix DMX or also called Symmetrix Family 6.0

Released Feb 2003 and sold through 2006

Direct Matrix Architecture (Data General Backplane) introduced

DMX800 was the first DMX system introduced

4 Slice directors introduced

RAID 5 introduced after being introduced on DMX-3

First generation with common DA / FA hardware

Introduction of modular power

Enginuity Microcode 5669.xx.xx, 5670.xx.xx, 5671.xx.xx

Symmetrix DMX800: Single cabinet, DAE based concept for drives, 96 drives (I swear, a customer told me, they have ghost like issues with their DMX800)

Symmetrix DMX1000: Single cabinet, 18 drives per loop, 144 drives total

Symmetrix DMX1000-P: Single cabinet, 9 drives per loop, 144 drives total, P= Performance System

Symmetrix DMX2000: Dual cabinet, modular power, 18 drives per loop, 288 drives

Symmetrix DMX2000-P: Dual cabinet, modular power, 9 drives per loop, 288 drives, P=Performance System

Symmetrix DMX3000-3: Triple cabinet, modular power, 18 drives per loop, 3 phase power, 576 drives

To read about EMC Symmetrix DMX Hardware components

To read about EMC Symmetrix DMX models and major differences

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Symmetrix DMX2 or also called Symmetrix Family 6.5

Released Feb 2004 and sold through 2007

Double the processing using DMX2

DMX and DMX2 frames are same, only directors from DMX must be changed to upgrade to DMX2, reboot of entire systems required with this upgrade

RAID 5 introduced after being introduced on DMX-3

64GB memory introduced

4 Slice Directors

Enginuity Microcode 5669.xx.xx, 5670.xx.xx, 5671.xx.xx

Symmetrix DMX801: 2nd generation DMX, Single cabinet, DAE based concept for drives, 96 drives, FC SPE 2 (I swear, a customer told me, they have ghost like issues with their DMX800)

Symmetrix DMX1000-M2: 2nd generation DMX, Single cabinet, 18 drives per loop, 144 drives

Symmetrix DMX1000-P2: 2nd generation DMX, Single cabinet, 9 drives per loop, 144 drives, P=Performance System

Symmetrix DMX2000-M2: 2nd generation DMX, Dual cabinet, 18 drives per loop, 288 drives

Symmetrix DMX2000-P2: 2nd generation DMX, Dual cabinet, 9 drives per loop, 288 drives, P=Performance System

Symmetrix DMX2000-M2-3: 2nd generation DMX, Dual cabinet, 18 drives per loop, 288 drives, 3 Phase power

Symmetrix DMX2000-P2-3: 2nd generation DMX, Dual cabinet, 9 drives per loop, 288 drives, P=Performance System, 3 Phase power

Symmetrix DMX3000-M2-3: 2nd generation DMX, Triple cabinet, 18 drives per loop, 576 drives, 3 Phase power

To read about EMC DMX Symmetrix Hardware components

To read about EMC Symmetrix DMX models and major differences

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Symmetrix DMX-3 or also called Symmetrix 7.0

Released July 2005 and still being sold

8 Slice directors

1920 disk (RPQ ‘ed to 2400 drives)

DAE based concept introduced

Symmetrix Priority Controls

RAID 5 introduced and then implemented on older DMX, DMX-2

Virtual LUN technology

SRDF enhancements

Concept of vaulting introduced

Enginuity microcode 5771.xx.xx, 5772.xx.xx

Symmetrix DMX-3 950: System Cabinet, Storage Bay x 2, 360 drives max, Modular Power, 3 Phase power

Symmetrix DMX-3: System Cabinet, Storage Bay x 8 (Expandable), 1920 drives max, RPQ’ed to 2400 drives, 3 Phase power

To read about differences between EMC Symmetrix DMX3 and DMX4 platforms

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Symmetrix DMX-4 or also called Symmetrix 7.0

Released July 2007 and still being sold

Virtual provisioning

Flash Drives

FC / SATA drives

RAID 6 introduced

SRDF enhancements

Total Cache: 512 GB

Total Storage: 1 PB

Largest drive supported 1TB SATA drive

Flash drives 73GB, 146GB later now support for 200GB and 400GB released

1920 drives max (RPQ’ed to 2400 drives)

Enginuity microcode 5772.xx.xx, 5773.xx.xx

Symmetrix DMX-4 950: System Cabinet, Storage Bay x 2, 360 drives max, Modular Power, 3 Phase power

Symmetrix DMX-4: System Cabinet, Storage Bay x 8 (Expandable), 1920 drives max, RPQ’ed to 2400 drives, Modular power, 3 Phase Power

Some models sold as DMX-4 1500, DMX-4 2500, DMX-4 3500 and DMX-4 4500

To read about a blog post on EMC Symmetrix: DMX4 Components

To read about differences between EMC Symmetrix DMX3 and DMX4 platforms

To read about different drives types supported on EMC Symmetrix DMX4 Platform

To read about differences between EMC Symmetrix DMX4 and V-Max Systems

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Symmetrix V-Max

(Released April 2009)

Enginuity Microcode 5874.xxx.xxx

Total number of drives supported: 2400

Total Cache: 1 TB mirrored (512GB usable)

Total Storage: 2 PB

All features on the V-Max have been discussed earlier on the blog post linked below

Symmetrix V-Max SE: Single System Bay, SE=Single Engine, Storage Bay x 2, 360 drives max, cannot be expanded to a full blown 8 engine system if purchased as a SE, 3 Phase power, Modular Power

Symmetrix V-Max: System Cabinet, Storage Bay x 10, 2400 drives max, modular power, 3 phase power

To read about differences between EMC Symmetrix DMX4 and V-Max Systems

To read about different drives types supported on EMC Symmetrix V-Max Platforms

To read all about the EMC Symmetrix V-Max Platform

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I could have easily added total memory capacity per frame, total number of dedicated DA/DAF slots, total slots, total universal slots, total memory slots, but then I didn’t know information on some of the old systems and didn’t want to be incorrect on them.

Hope you have enjoyed reading this post, with a bit of history related to the Symmetrix platform. I am pretty positive, as of today you will not find this consolidated information on any blog or the manufacturers website.

I really wish, EMC decided to open blogging to some Symmetrix, Clariion, Celerra, Centera specialist that support these systems on a day to day basis, the information that could come out from those guys could be phenomenal. Barry Burke writes a lot of stuff, but again a lot of FUD from him against IBM and HDS, its great reading him, but only a controlled amount of technical information comes from him.

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