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Clariion CX, CX3, CX4 – How to change IP Address of the SP

December 15th, 2008 No comments

When you initially install a new storage system, you must run the Navisphere Storage System Initialization Utility which prompts you to configure IP addresses for the SPs and set up accounts to log in to the SPs. You use these IP addresses when you connect and log into Navisphere Manager.

For an existing storage system that has been installed, initialized, configured, and possibly used, you must use Navisphere Manager to change the IP address of an SP. This FAQ outlines how to change the IP address of an SP on an existing storage system.

IMPORTANT: Before you change the IP address of an SP, if the storage system is on a domain, you must remove that storage system from the domain. When you enter a new IP address and accept the acknowledgments to change the address, you will be disconnected and the SP will reboot. You will then need to log onto the SP using the new address and add the storage system to a domain. If the storage system was the domain Master, when you re-connect, you will need to either recreate the domain and become master or else join another domain.

Dont forget to create the PPP Dialup Connection before attempting to login to the SP, otherwise it will fail

1. Open Navisphere Manager.

2. If the storage system is in a domain, remove it from the domain.

3. Under the Storage tab, click and expand the icon for the storage system that you want to modify.

4. Right-click the SP whose IP address you want to change and select Properties.

5. Click the Network tab.

6. Enter the new IP address in the IP Address field.

7. Click Apply to apply the change.

Note: If you have not removed the SP from the domain, you will see a prompt that strongly suggests that you cancel the operation and remove the SP from the domain before changing the SP’s IP address. Click either Yes to continue or No to cancel the address change.

8. At the confirmation prompt, click Yes to continue or No to cancel the IP address change.

9. At the second confirmation prompt, click Yes to continue or No to cancel the IP address change.

Note: Either Navisphere Manager will fail over to the unchanged SP, or the Navisphere Manager session will disconnect. In either case, the changed SP will reboot and will be available at the new IP address.

10. If Navisphere manager did not fail over to the unchanged SP, log into Navisphere Manager on either SP, noting that the changed SP has the new address.

11. Add the storage system to an existing domain or if necessary, create a new domain with the SP as master. See Help in Navisphere Manager.

Note: For further information on using Navisphere Manager, click Help in Navisphere Manager.

Clariion CX, CX3, CX4 – How to add Storage Capacity to Attached Host

December 15th, 2008 No comments

This article outlines how to add storage capacity to your storage system. You may have already performed some of the steps. See the appropriate procedure for your operating system.

Microsoft Windows

1. If needed, add new drives to the storage system.

2. If needed, create a hot spare using Navisphere Manager.

3. If needed, create an additional RAID group on the drives using Navisphere Manager.

4. Create (bind) additional LUNs on the RAID group using Navisphere Manager.

5. Assign the new LUNs to the server using Navisphere Manager.

6. Verify that the new LUNs were assigned to the server using Navisphere Manager.

7. On the server, verify that the server has access to the LUNs:

a. On the Windows desktop, right-click My Computer and click Manage.

b. In the left pane of the Computer Management dialog box, double-click on the storage icon.

c. Click Disk Management.

d. Verify that the LUNs that you added are listed in the right pane.

8. Start or restart the Navisphere Host Agent to push the server’s LUN mapping and operating system information to the storage system.

9. On the server, start PowerPath and verify that PowerPath sees all of the paths to the LUN.

Linux

1. If needed, add new drives to the storage system.

2. If needed, create a hot spare using Navisphere Manager.

3. If needed, create an additional RAID group on the drives using Navisphere Manager.

4. Create (bind) additional LUNs on the RAID group using Navisphere Manager.

5. Assign the new LUNs to the server using Navisphere Manager.

6. Verify that the LUNs were assigned to the server using Navisphere Manager.

7. On the server, verify that all LUNS have entries in the /proc/scsi/scsi/ directory.

8. On the server, verify that each LUN has an entry in the appropriate HBA file:

· For QLogic HBAs, the entry is in proc/scsi/qlaxxx/hba_number

· For Emulex HBAs, the entry is in /proc/scsi/lpfc/hba_number

9. On the server, verify that the failover software recognizes all of the paths to the LUNs.

For example, for PowerPath, verify that PowerPath recognizes all of the paths to the LUNs using the powermt command: powermt display dev=all class=clariion

10. Partition the LUN and then create and mount a file system to make the LUN available to the operating system.

11. Run the Navisphere Host Agent to push the server’s LUN mapping and operating system information to the storage system.

12. Save the failover configuration.

For example, for PowerPath, save the PowerPath configuration using the powermt save command.

13. On the server, verify that the server and failover software sees all of the paths to the LUN.V

For example, for PowerPath, verify the configuration using the powermt display command.

Novell NetWare

1. If needed, add new drives to the storage system.

2. If needed, create a hot spare using Navisphere Manager.

3. If needed, create an additional RAID group using Navisphere Manager.

4. Create (bind) additional LUNs on the RAID group using Navisphere Manager.

5. Assign the new LUNs to the server using Navisphere Manager.

6. Verify that the new LUNs were assigned to the server using Navisphere Manager.

7. On the server, verify that the PowerPath failover software recognizes all of the paths to the LUNs. Use the powermt command:

powermt display dev=all class=clariion

7. Create NSS or NWFS partitions or volumes on the LUNs.

8. Make the LUNs available to the operating system; on the LUNs create and mount NetWare NWFS volumes or NetWare NSS partitions or volumes.

9. Restart Navisphere Agent.

10. Save the PowerPath failover configuration using the powermt save command.

Clariion CX, CX3, CX4 – Settings for Dailup PPP into the Clariion machines

December 15th, 2008 No comments

To be able to setup the IP address, domain security, etc in many cases you have to Dailup into the Clariion SP using a PPP connection.

For dialing into the Clariion using Symmremote or any other remote dial in software, you will need to use the Dialup PPP connection first.

Please see below how to create the connection.

Control Panel
Phone and Modem Options
Under the Modems tab, click on Add
Don’t select my modem, i will select it from a list
The Add/Remove Hardware Wizard will open up, select Standard Modem Type
Under Models, Select Communications Cable between two computers
Select your port example, Com1, Com2 or if you are using USB based serial cable you might want to use Com6, Com7.
Finish

Now you need to Setup Dialup Networking

Control Panel
Network and Dialup Connections
Create a new Connection
Using the Network Connection Wizard, select Guest
Select the Communications between two computers
Com Port you just created or used above
You can create this for all the users
Name your connection
Under Modem Configurations, click on Maximum Speed and select 115200, Enable Hardware Flow Control
Close
Under the networking tab, your PPP should appear select Type of dial-up server I am calling
Click Settings
Enable LCP Extensions
Enable software compression
Select Internet Protocol (TCP/IP)
Click on Properties
Obtain IP address automatically
Obtain DNS Server address automatically
Under the Advanced Tab, Use IP header compression
Deselect Use Default Gateway on remote network
Ok
Close

Happy Clariion DIALING!!!!!!!!!!!!!

DMX, DMX2 and the Early days of Symmetrix

December 10th, 2008 No comments

It’s getting pretty late here in Atlanta. Travelling to this part of the US for two days for business visit to win some business. Had a long good day, couple of meetings at the office, flew in Atlanta, had dinner, some drinks and now this blog……. hope I can finish it……

 

I am really not sure if the title of this blog is exactly what this blog is about, but I think it is quite closer….

 

So from the Symmetrix (SCSI based Disk Arrays), EMC moved aggressively to release the all Fiber based disk array, now called Symmetrix DMX (Direct Matrix Architecture). While the DMX was a major move or an upgrade from SCSI – 40Mbps Disk I/O to a new speed of 2048Mbps Disk I/O.

Early in the days the major bottle neck use to be around the Disks speeds. With the I/O’s per second reaching 2 Gbps on the DMX1 and DMX2, the disk drives now work at the same speed as the fiber directors I/O’s per second. The DMX was a notch above with atleast 40 times better performance than its predecessor Symmetrix.

The backend of the DMX Symmetrix came from the acquisition of Data General. The DMX800 was one of those hybrid boxes that got EMC Symmetrix engineers really confused about how to use the DG Clariion backend on a Symmetrix Enterprise Level System and they created the DMX800 (oh believe it or not, I have had customers telling me they have ghost like issues on that box).

A Clariion architecture to be implemented with a Symmetrix Enginuity Code is a DMX800 (don’t get me wrong, I am not talking bad about the Clariion, we are comparing the enterprise level machine code running on a really strong mid tier machine). EMC Symmetrix Engineers learned a lot from it and then came the DMX1000 and DMX2000. With the early success, EMC went to work on a much larger config of the DMX3000. As much as the DMX3000 is more or less the same technology as the DMX1000 and DMX2000, the memory requirements, power requirements, device numbers, address spaces, memory, algorithms, data structures, productive laptop (Service Processor) required for handling the memory and address space on Symmwin were much different. The Enginuity Code was now able to handle drives (volume addresses) much more than the older Symmetrix 5.5 and the new DMX1000 and DMX2000.

So during that time came the Enginuity code 5669 on the DMX800 and the DMX1000. Ask the Symmetrix engineers what happened? Every day the drives would drop, loops would drop causing backend issues, it was a support and engineering nightmare in real sense.  These were the good old days of EMC making tons of money, but again as the call volumes went up and they starting selling more boxes internationally, it got EMC to start creating product support labs in Sydney, Australia and Bangalore, India on top of Hopkinton, MA and Cork, Ireland.

Almost after a year of the DMX, EMC now was at a point of releasing the DMX2 which in essence would be 2 times more faster than then its predecessor, the DMX. The DMX processors per director were of speeds of 500 Mhz Power PCs. With the DMX2 now each director was configured with atleast 1Ghz Power PC chips.

This was more a data-in-place upgrade like they offered on the Clariions back in the day. This would be a change of all directors throughout the box. The only drawback was this was an offline change and customers get scared away from the offline events. With the DMX2, now it would support the 73GB – 15K disk drives, Single memory board going up to 32GB and the largest memory configs being supported upto 256GB.

Also with the DMX1000, DMX2000 and DMX3000 and the 5670 code came a native support for RAID5 (3RAID5 and 7RAID5) on top of Mirroring (M1/M2), RAID S (3+1 and 7+1), BCV and DRV devices. Now with the support of RAID5, EMC all of a sudden started competing in the market between the mid tier and the enterprise applications. Enterprise customers requiring data storage for mid tier applications and non critical applications started using RAID5 along with some customers using it for critical business continuance backups.

Raid5 was a big boon for system administrators and storage administrators, which in essence they were all used to across all their other storage platforms and systems. Now with almost a similar protection level, you could lose a member device of a Raid5 and still be fully functional, like losing a mirror. There are still drawbacks of losing another member in the same Raid group or losing a mirror whose partner is already down. The concepts of BCV’s would come in to play in these situations.

Anyways, the DMX is where EMC made a big impact into the storage market. EMC used to be a 6 Billion company in 2004 to being about 13 Billion in 2008. A lot of it has to do with the software acquisitions but their move to get into the fiber based storage market has put them to being the storage industry solutions provider company over the past decade.

The internal transformation of EMC under its existing management from being a Hardware Storage Company to being a Hardware/Software Storage Company to being a Storage Solutions company has kept EMC as a leader in this industry……