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GestaltIT TechFieldDay 2: The Delegates, the Presenters and the Technology Innovators

April 7th, 2010 No comments

GestaltIT TechFieldDay is being kicked off on Thursday 8th of April 2010, a two day event by GestaltIT. The pre event party is being hosted at the Hyatt in Boston, MA on Wednesday evening.

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Previous post on TechFieldDay 2, here

So here are the delegates attending this event.

All the delegates come from different facets of IT and bring a varied background in terms of technology and experience. Most of the delegates focus around Storage, Virtualization, Servers, Networking and Enterprise IT. Being in the trenches they have learned a lot, want to share the experience and bring a unique perspective on what Enterprise IT is all about and possibly help address some next generation issues.

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Here are the delegates with their own areas of expertise.

  • Virtualization Experts
  • Jason Boche
  • Carlo Costanzo
  • David Davis
  • Edward Haletky
  • Simon Long
  • Simon Seagrave
  • Gabrie van Zanten
  • Networking Experts
  • Greg Ferro
  • Storage Experts
  • Robin Harris
  • Greg Knieriemen
  • Bas Raayman
  • Not sure if I can call myself an expert…but sure storage centric
  • Enterprise Experts
  • Scott D. Lowe
  • John Obeto
  • Matt Simmons

Totally a very heavy focus on Virtualization this time around based on the heavy weight Virtualization experts we have in the team.

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As for the Presenting Sponsors, here is the list of Companies we know so far that are attending

  • Cisco Systems
  • Data Robotics
  • EMC Corporation
  • HP
  • VKernel

And sure, many more non-presenting sponsors of dinner and GestaltIT parties.

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So some of the technology we are looking forward to hear and talk about this week

  • Cisco Systems:
    • UCS, Nexus, Cisco OTV and Long Distance vMotion.
  • Data Robotics:
    • Drobo Elite, Drobo Pro and Drobo FS
  • EMC Corporation:
    • Unified Storage, Federation, vBlocks, VCE Acadia, FCoE, Symmetrix
  • HP Company:
    • IBRIX or now called the HP X9000
  • VKernel:
    • Optimization and Capacity Tools for VM environments

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Be Prepared, if you are coming to the GestaltIT Tech Field Day and are on either side of the fence….

So after attending the Tech Field Day in San Francisco, CA late last year and having attended some Storage Tech days at HP, here is my advice to everyone either attending as delegates or presenters.

  • Expect hectic two and a half days
  • Be prepared for less sleep
  • Mental exhaustion
  • No time to blog
  • Network with fellow Delegates
  • Roundtable discussions
  • Record, Record, Record
  • Come armed with your Twittering and Blogging tools (Camera, Video Cam, microphone, batteries, memory sticks, etc…

Here is the post by the previous TechFieldday delegates, talking about being armed with all the necessary tools and the expectations with Techfieldday

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For the presenters…

  • Stop the crap
  • Be heavily prepared
  • Give information that people are looking for
  • Expect the unexpected
  • Have answers ready, not let me get back to you

And if you are presenting, I would highly recommend reading this post by the previous TechFieldday Delegates, as to what is fair…

The technology innovators, I would highly recommend pick the brains of these invited delegates, get them to share some of their experiences, understand what they see in the industry, where they see things are headed, where they see issues, what they consider as your organizations positive and negative points. Share!! Share!! Share!!

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So…………… are you ready for the action, tweets, technology talk, deep dives and an opportunity to learn more about Enterprise IT? The after effects of TechFieldDay are typically seen for weeks in form of twitter chatter, blog posts and vendor communication.See you all soon……delegates, vendors, presenters and technology innovators…

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For the fellow twitter friends, you can follow me on Twitter @storagenerve, Twitter hashtag for GestaltIT Tech Field Day is: #TechFieldDay.

You can follow (list) all TechFieldDay 2 Delegates on Twitter here.

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Cheers
@storagenerve

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Disclaimer:
The sponsors are each paying their share for this non-profit event. We, the delegates, are not paid to attend this event. Most of us will take some days off from our regular job to attend. What is paid for us is the flight, meals and the stay at a hotel. We are not required to write positive, negative or neutral reviews about any vendors or this event.

HP Blades Day 2010: Final Thoughts

March 3rd, 2010 1 comment

This is my 5th consecutive post on HP Blades day.  So far no videos have been uploaded, just the coverage of the event and pictures. This post primarily focuses on what I feel we saw at HP in terms of things that will help them, challenges in the market and where all this may go.

There has been at least 6 to 8 hours of video recording on my flip camera; starting tomorrow I will upload these videos only of the most interesting sessions on the blog.

Satellite View of HP Facilities in Houston, TX

The coverage of the event can also be found on Greg Knieriemen’s Infosmack Podcast on Storage Monkeys, here.

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Positives

This event was a very smart move by HP and as far as I can see they have exceeded their expectations with this event. Though I felt the twitter activity with HP Tech Day (Storage, #hptechday) was much higher than what we saw with this event HP Blades Day (Blades, #hpbladesday). Though the after discussions have taken over the blogging, twitter and the Internet press by surprise with the number of tweets, blogs and press articles written about this event.

Clearly for me this was a good platform to learn, understand and share some visions and technologies related to HP Blade products. I have been a storage focused individual, but only with a shallow knowledge of the blades architecture and infrastructure. This was a great event for myself to understand the depth of these products and take a deep dive into the interworking of converged infrastructure. An Event like this helps understand and connect the dots together with future products and emerging technologies. As this was a non-NDA event, we didn’t have preview to the next generation of HP Blade products.

One thing that is pretty visible and positive is that HP has managed to mobilize resources in the direction of integrating internal resources relating to converged infrastructure. Though its obvious and again visible that at places, they have not been able to fulfill that dream entirely.

There were some awkward moments where the engineering teams were asked to not do a deep-dive on other vendor technologies. The marketing folks spoke about some strategy related to these technologies and painted an overall picture. The mix of people involved with the presentations and demos seem to accomplish the agenda. Marketing pitches by social media and marketing teams along with engineering details by the architecture teams seemed to accomplish their goals.

The highlight of the sessions were a 45 min talk with the CTO of StorageWorks, Paul Perez and the competitive intelligence session that was hosted my Gary Thome and his team to compare HP Blades products with Dell, IBM and Cisco UCS. Discussions around CEE and Virtual Connect were pretty interesting.

HP emphasized the 250 million dollar investment with Microsoft over and over during the HP Blades Day. This proves that they value this partnership heavily and possibly have a roadmap associated in the future with great integration with Microsoft products.

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Challenges

HP emphasizes a lot on converged datacenters and the products it’s gearing for the next generation. But an integration vision from a convergence management was still lacking, a direction or a strategy on how these pieces of puzzle will be joined together and managed. HP clearly owns all the stacks of the next generation products, but again the orchestration and integration is one thing that is not very clear yet. Say too big and too much to manage!!!

With Networking products and the focus on Virtual Connect, HP seems to be moving in the right direction, but again when it comes to FCoE and CEE (Converged Enhanced Ethernet) the direction is pretty unknown. It’s sort of wait and watch as to where the market goes and drives demands, a lack of vision in real terms. HP clearly has a big competition from Cisco when it comes to the Networking stack.

With Storage products, HP clearly has a very big competition with already proven Vendors and their technologies like EMC, NetApp and IBM. Also technologies that are strong and emerging would largely cause market nuisance or focus disruption for HP.

With the Blade products, HP is a market leader, but truly considers Dell, IBM and Cisco as the biggest threats and sort of prepared to fight against it. Seems the next generation Rack and Blade products might seem to have a lot of integration with storage and networking.

The services story, with the acquisition of EDS, HP made a move in the right direction being the first in the market to do so. With the latest acquisitions from Dell of Perot Systems, from Oracle of SUN Microsystems and by Xerox of ACS, large vendors are all trying to fulfill the services gap. HP clearly has a big competition with IBM and Oracle in the space.

The VCE (VMware, Cisco, EMC) coalition: What are your thoughts. It’s pretty amazing to see HP not mention the word ‘cloud’ these two days. Focus has been virtualization and the partnership with VMware, but really no focus on moving toward utility market and integration of all next gen products for converged datacenters with the underlying virtualization layer. May be the Microsoft partnership may fulfill this.

VMware or Microsoft: They didn’t say this, but seems something is cooking. The partnership with Microsoft and the investment of 250 million dollars will create some friction with VMware, at least my guess. Next gen products may utilize Hyper-V as an underlying virtualization layer rather than using the default VMware Hypervisor.

HP still needs a very strong storage technology in the Enterprise space that is their own and not OEM’d. The truth is, eventually the HP – Hitachi relationship has to come to an end with HP’s new product that may compete in the same market space. This strategy will enable HP to be very unique in terms of the markets they serve, which may include their own in-house storage products for SMB, Midsize and Enterprise customers.

So other lacking things from HP were the Cloud Strategy (if they ever plan to enter that space), FCoE discussions, Procurve and Storage Management as it relates to Insight Software.

It may have been very hard to cover all these platforms in a day and a half with giving all the technology details behind it. Also remember this was a non-NDA session, so we were not preview to all the future products and technologies.

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Summary

Overall HP did hammer us for 2 consecutive days with HP Blades Technology. Coming out of it, I can truly say, HP had so much focus on datacenter convergence. Their move to hire Dave Donatelli was a smart one many of his strategic moves and direction in the ESSN (Enterprise Servers, Storage and Networking) are pretty visible now.

Apart from GestaltIT Techfield Day, HP is still the only OEM to arrange Bloggers Invite Only Event. The ratio of Bloggers to HP Personnel was 1:2, giving everyone a lot of attention.

Now the question is who will be next OEM to do a similar event and what will they do to prove themselves different. Already hearing some buzz in the industry about some the effects of HP Blades Day and some possible events from other OEMs.

But I clearly see an advantage of an event like this and the after effects of it, good move HP Marketing Team! Along with Ivy Worldwide!!

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Disclaimer: This event is sponsored by HP and hosted in Houston, TX. HP paid all the flight, living and mostly food expenses. This is a bloggers – invitation only event. No products have been given by HP.

HP Techday 2009: The Final Thoughts!

October 2nd, 2009 4 comments

This is my 5th consecutive post on HP TechDay in Colorado Springs.

HP Techday 2009 Updates

HP TechDay 2009 Day 0

HP TechDay 2009 Day 1

HP TechDay 2009 Day 2

Screen shot 2009-10-01 at 8.05.25 PM

HP facilities in Colorado Springs, a Satellite view

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Positives

This event was a very smart move by HP and as far as I can see they have exceeded their expectations with this event. It was truly a fireworks of hash tag #hptechday both Monday and Tuesday which dominated twitter. The after discussions have taken over the blogging, twitter and the Internet press by surprise with the number of twits, blogs and press articles written about this event.

Clearly for me this was a good platform to learn, understand and share some visions and technologies related to HP Storage products. An Event like this helps understand and connect the dots together with future products and emerging technologies.

The R&D and Engineering teams gave us a good background of the inter-workings of the storage technology not necessarily the intra-workings of all technologies messed together. There were some awkward moments, but overall they pulled it together really well. The marketing folks spoke about some strategy related to these technologies and painted an overall picture. The mix of people involved with the presentations and demos seem to accomplish the agenda, where marketing pitches came in with engineering details.

HP really left competition out of all the discussions except for the hands-on lab. No mentions of EMC, NetApp, IBM, Cisco or HDS. The hands-on lab did have an exercise on NetApp FAS2050C and an EMC Clariion CX4-120 for LUN provisioning purposes in comparison to LUN provisioning on HP EVA’s. It was a positive strategy from HP, not to compare their products to that of EMC, NetApp and others.

A lot of discussions revolved around Virtualization related to VMware, Xen and Hyper-V, but HP made it clear they were VMware’s largest revenue producing partner and would like to remain so.

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Challenges

Platforms like EVA, SVSP, Lefthand, IBRIX and D2D were discussed. Independently every platform looks very interesting and very compelling. But an integration vision was still lacking, a direction or a strategy on how these pieces of puzzle will be joined together to form the common storage platform.  Though HP clearly seems to be making a move towards Converged Data Centers.

HP clearly has a very big competition in the storage market with already proven Vendors and their technologies. EMC, NetApp, IBM, Cisco, VMware in storage, networking and Converged Data Centers. Also technologies that are strong and emerging would largely cause market nuisance or focus disruption for HP.

One of the biggest problems I saw was, HP has these segments of storage and technology, rather not a unified vision, or didn’t come across as one. There are pouches of storage like EVA teams, SVSP teams, Lefthand teams and so forth, not sure if there is technology sharing and again a moved towards integrating all these technologies to form a unified storage platform. Though Proliant is the chosen platform for all Lefthand and Converged Data Center products.

HP still needs a very strong storage technology in the Enterprise space that is there own and not OEM’d. The truth is, eventually the HP – Hitachi relationship has to come to an end with HP’s new product that may compete in the same market space. This strategy will enable HP to be very unique in terms of the markets they serve, which may include their own inhouse storage products for SMB, Midsize and Enterprise customers.

So other lacking things from HP were the Cloud Strategy (if they ever plan to enter that space), Unified Storage details, FCoE discussions, Procurve, Deduplication platform discussions, IBRIX technology integration details, Storage Management, Storage Optimization and XP.

It may have been very hard to cover all these platforms in a day and a half with giving all the technology details behind it. Also remember this was an NON NDA session, so we were not preview to all the future products and technologies.

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Summary

Overall HP did hammer us for 2 consecutive days with HP Storage Technology. Coming out of it, I can truly say I didn’t realize HP had so much focus on Storage. Their move to hire Dave Donatelli was a smart one and hope over the next year as the Storage business moves under him; he will insert some new strategic direction.

So HP was the first OEM to arrange the HP Techday and make it open to Bloggers as an Invite Only Event. The ratio of Bloggers to HP Personnel was 1:2, giving everyone a lot of attention.

Now the question is who will be next OEM to do a similar event and what will they do to prove themselves different. Already hearing some buzz in the industry about some the effects of HP Techday and some possible events from other OEMs.

But I clearly see an advantage of an event like this and the after effects of it, Good move HP Storage – Marketing Team!

EMC Symmetrix, 20 Years in the making

July 29th, 2009 1 comment

So next year will mark a history of Symmetrix Products within EMC, still classified as one of the most robust systems out there after 20 years of its inception. In this blog post, we will talk about some facts on Symmetrix products as it relates to its features, characteristics, Enginuity microcode versions, model numbers, year released, etc.

Also in this blog post you will see links to most of my previous posts about Symmetrix products.

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So the journey of Symmetrix systems started with Moshe Yanai (along with his team) joining EMC in late 80’s. A floating story says, the idea of a cache based disk array was initially pitched to both IBM and HP and was shot down.  EMC was predominately a mainframe memory selling company back in the late 1980’s. The Symmetrix products completely changed the direction of EMC in a decade.

Joe Tucci comes in at the end of 90’s from Unisys with a big vision. Wanted to radically change EMC. Through new acquisitions, new technologies, vision and foremost the integration of all the technologies created today’s EMC.

Symmetrix has always been the jewel of EMC. Back in the Moshe days, the engineers were treated so royally (Have heard stories about helicopter rides and lavish parties with a satellite bus waiting outside for a support call). Then comes the Data General acquisition in late 90’s that completely changed the game.

Some people within EMC were against the DG acquisition and didn’t see much value in it. While the Clariion DG backplane is what changed the Symmetrix to a Symmetrix DMX – Fiber Based Drives. Over this past decade, EMC radically changes its position and focuses on acquisitions, support, products, quality, efficiency, usability and foremost changing itself from a hardware company to an Information Solutions company focusing on software as its integral growth factor.  New acquisitions like Legato, Documentum, RSA, kept on changing the culture and the growth focus within EMC.

Then came VMware and it changed the rules of the game, EMC’s strategic move to invest into VMware paid off big time.  Then happens the 3-way partnership between VMware – EMC – Cisco, to integrate next generation products, V-Max (Symmetrix), V-Sphere and UCS are born.

Here we are in 2009, almost at the end of 20 years since the inception of the Symmetrix, the name, the product, the Enginuity code, the robust characteristics, the investment from EMC all stays committed with changing market demands.

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Jumping back into the Symmetrix, here are a few articles you might find interesting, overall talking about various models, serial numbers of the machines and importantly a post on Enginuity Operating Environment.

To read about EMC Symmetrix Enginuity Operating Environment

To read about EMC Symmetrix Serial Number naming convention,

To read about EMC Symmetrix Models in a previous blog post

To read about various EMC models based on different Platforms

To read about all EMC Clariion models since the Data General Acquisition

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Symmetrix Family 1.0

ICDA – Integrated Cache Disk Array

Released 1990 and sold through 1993

A 24GB total disk space introduced

Wow, I was in elementary school or may be middle school when this first generation Symmetrix was released….

Symmetrix 4200

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Symmetrix Family 2.0

ICDA – Integrated Cache Disk Array

Released 1991 and sold through 1994

A 36GB total disk space

Mirroring introduced

Symmetrix 4400

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Symmetrix Family 2.5

ICDA – Integrated Cache Disk Array

Released 1992 and sold through 1995

RSF capabilities added

(I actually met a guy about 2 years ago, he was one of the engineers that had worked on developing the first RSF capabilities at EMC and was very instrumental in developing the Hopkinton PSE lab)

Symmetrix 4800:

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Symmetrix Family 3.0 also called Symmetrix 3000 and 5000 Series

Released 1994 and sold through 1997

ICDA: Integrated Cache Disk Array

Includes Mainframe Support (Bus & Tag)

Global Cache introduced

1GB total Cache

NDU – Microcode

SRDF introduced

Supports Mainframe and open systems both

Enginuity microcode 50xx, 51xx

Symmetrix 3100: Open systems support, half height cabinet, 5.25 inch drives

Symmetrix 5100: Mainframe support, half height cabinet, 5.25 inch drives

Symmetrix 3200: Open Systems support, single cabinet, 5.25 inch drives

Symmetrix 5200: Mainframe support, single cabinet, 5.25 inch drives

Symmetrix 3500: Open Systems support, triple cabinet, 5.25 inch drives

Symmetrix 5500: Mainframe support, triple cabinet, 5.25 inch drives

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Symmetrix Family 4.0 also called Symmetrix 3000 and 5000 Series

Released 1997 and sold through 2000

RAID XP introduced

3.5 Inch drive size introduced

On triple cabinet systems 5.25 inch drives used

Supports Mainframe and Open Systems both

Timefinder, Powerpath, Ultra SCSI support

Enginuity microcode 5265.xx.xx, 5266.xx.xx

Symmetrix 3330: Open Systems Support, half height cabinet, 32 drives, 3.5 inch drives

Symmetrix 5330: Mainframe Support, half height cabinet, 32 drives, 3.5 inch drives

Symmetrix 3430: Open Systems Support, single frame, 96 drives, 3.5 inch drives

Symmetrix 5430: Mainframe Support, single frame, 96 drives, 3.5 inch drives

Symmetrix 3700: Open Systems Support, triple cabinet, 128 drives, 5.25 inch drives

Symmetrix 5700: Mainframe Support, triple cabinet, 128 drives, 5.25 inch drives

To read about EMC Symmetrix Hardware Components

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Symmetrix Family 4.8 also called Symmetrix 3000 and 5000 Series

Released 1998 and sold through 2001

Symmetrix Optimizer Introduced

Best hardware so far: least outages, least problems and least failures (not sure if EMC will agree to it, most customers do)

3.5 inch drives used with all models

Enginuity microcode 5265.xx.xx, 5266.xx.xx, 5267.xx.xx

Symmetrix 3630: Open Systems support, half height cabinet, 32 drives

Symmetrix 5630: Mainframe support, half height cabinet, 32 drives

Symmetrix 3830: Open Systems support, single cabinet, 96 drives

Symmetrix 5830: Mainframe support, single cabinet, 96 drives

Symmetrix 3930: Open Systems support, triple cabinet, 256 drives

Symmetrix 5930: Mainframe support, triple cabinet, 256 drives

Models sold as 3630-18, 3630-36, 3630-50, 5630-18, 5630-36, 5630-50,3830-36, 3830-50, 3830-73, 5830-36, 5830-50, 5830-73, 3930-36, 3930-50, 3930-73, 5930-36, 5930-50, 5930-73 (the last two digits indicate the drives installed in the frame)

To read about EMC Symmetrix Hardware Components

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Symmetrix Family 5.0 also called Symmetrix 8000 Series

[ 3000 (open sytems) + 5000 (mainframe) = 8000 (support for both) ]

Supports Open Systems and Mainframe without BUS and TAG through ESCON

Released 2000 and sold through 2003

181GB Disk introduced

Enginuity microcode 5567.xx.xx, 5568.xx.xx

Symmetrix 8130: Slim cabinet, 48 drives

Symmetrix 8430: Single cabinet, 96 drives

Symmetrix 8730: Triple cabinet, 384 drives

Some models sold as 8430-36, 8430-73, 8430-181 or 8730-36, 8730-73, 8730-181 (the last two digits indicate the drives installed in the frame)

To read about EMC Symmetrix Hardware Components

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Symmetrix Family 5.5 LVD also called Symmetrix 8000 Series

Released 2001 and sold through 2004

LVD: Low Voltage Disk Introduced

146GB LVD drive introduced

Ultra SCSI drives cannot be used with the LVD frame

Mainframe optimized machines introduced

4 Slice directors introduced with ESCON and FICON

FICON introduced

Enginuity microcode 5567.xx.xx, 5568.xx.xx

Symmetrix 8230: Slim cabinet, 48 drives, (rebranded 8130, non lvd frame)

Symmetrix 8530: Single cabinet, 96 drives, (rebranded 8430, non lvd frame)

Symmetrix 8830: Triple cabinet, 384 drives, (rebranded 8730, non lvd frame)

Symmetrix 8230 LVD: LVD frame, slim cabinet, 48 LVD drives

Symmetrix 8530 LVD: LVD frame, single cabinet, 96 LVD drives

Symmetrix 8830 LVD: LVD frame, triple cabinet, 384 LVD drives

Symmetrix z-8530: LVD frame, Single cabinet, 96 drives, optimized for mainframes

Symmetrix z-8830: LVD frame, Triple cabinet, 384 drives, optimized for mainframe

Some models sold as 8530-36, 8530-73, 8530-146, 8530-181 or 8830-36, 8830-73, 8830-146, 8830-181 (the last two digits indicate the drives installed in the frame)

To read about EMC Symmetrix Hardware Components

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Symmetrix DMX or also called Symmetrix Family 6.0

Released Feb 2003 and sold through 2006

Direct Matrix Architecture (Data General Backplane) introduced

DMX800 was the first DMX system introduced

4 Slice directors introduced

RAID 5 introduced after being introduced on DMX-3

First generation with common DA / FA hardware

Introduction of modular power

Enginuity Microcode 5669.xx.xx, 5670.xx.xx, 5671.xx.xx

Symmetrix DMX800: Single cabinet, DAE based concept for drives, 96 drives (I swear, a customer told me, they have ghost like issues with their DMX800)

Symmetrix DMX1000: Single cabinet, 18 drives per loop, 144 drives total

Symmetrix DMX1000-P: Single cabinet, 9 drives per loop, 144 drives total, P= Performance System

Symmetrix DMX2000: Dual cabinet, modular power, 18 drives per loop, 288 drives

Symmetrix DMX2000-P: Dual cabinet, modular power, 9 drives per loop, 288 drives, P=Performance System

Symmetrix DMX3000-3: Triple cabinet, modular power, 18 drives per loop, 3 phase power, 576 drives

To read about EMC Symmetrix DMX Hardware components

To read about EMC Symmetrix DMX models and major differences

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Symmetrix DMX2 or also called Symmetrix Family 6.5

Released Feb 2004 and sold through 2007

Double the processing using DMX2

DMX and DMX2 frames are same, only directors from DMX must be changed to upgrade to DMX2, reboot of entire systems required with this upgrade

RAID 5 introduced after being introduced on DMX-3

64GB memory introduced

4 Slice Directors

Enginuity Microcode 5669.xx.xx, 5670.xx.xx, 5671.xx.xx

Symmetrix DMX801: 2nd generation DMX, Single cabinet, DAE based concept for drives, 96 drives, FC SPE 2 (I swear, a customer told me, they have ghost like issues with their DMX800)

Symmetrix DMX1000-M2: 2nd generation DMX, Single cabinet, 18 drives per loop, 144 drives

Symmetrix DMX1000-P2: 2nd generation DMX, Single cabinet, 9 drives per loop, 144 drives, P=Performance System

Symmetrix DMX2000-M2: 2nd generation DMX, Dual cabinet, 18 drives per loop, 288 drives

Symmetrix DMX2000-P2: 2nd generation DMX, Dual cabinet, 9 drives per loop, 288 drives, P=Performance System

Symmetrix DMX2000-M2-3: 2nd generation DMX, Dual cabinet, 18 drives per loop, 288 drives, 3 Phase power

Symmetrix DMX2000-P2-3: 2nd generation DMX, Dual cabinet, 9 drives per loop, 288 drives, P=Performance System, 3 Phase power

Symmetrix DMX3000-M2-3: 2nd generation DMX, Triple cabinet, 18 drives per loop, 576 drives, 3 Phase power

To read about EMC DMX Symmetrix Hardware components

To read about EMC Symmetrix DMX models and major differences

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Symmetrix DMX-3 or also called Symmetrix 7.0

Released July 2005 and still being sold

8 Slice directors

1920 disk (RPQ ‘ed to 2400 drives)

DAE based concept introduced

Symmetrix Priority Controls

RAID 5 introduced and then implemented on older DMX, DMX-2

Virtual LUN technology

SRDF enhancements

Concept of vaulting introduced

Enginuity microcode 5771.xx.xx, 5772.xx.xx

Symmetrix DMX-3 950: System Cabinet, Storage Bay x 2, 360 drives max, Modular Power, 3 Phase power

Symmetrix DMX-3: System Cabinet, Storage Bay x 8 (Expandable), 1920 drives max, RPQ’ed to 2400 drives, 3 Phase power

To read about differences between EMC Symmetrix DMX3 and DMX4 platforms

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Symmetrix DMX-4 or also called Symmetrix 7.0

Released July 2007 and still being sold

Virtual provisioning

Flash Drives

FC / SATA drives

RAID 6 introduced

SRDF enhancements

Total Cache: 512 GB

Total Storage: 1 PB

Largest drive supported 1TB SATA drive

Flash drives 73GB, 146GB later now support for 200GB and 400GB released

1920 drives max (RPQ’ed to 2400 drives)

Enginuity microcode 5772.xx.xx, 5773.xx.xx

Symmetrix DMX-4 950: System Cabinet, Storage Bay x 2, 360 drives max, Modular Power, 3 Phase power

Symmetrix DMX-4: System Cabinet, Storage Bay x 8 (Expandable), 1920 drives max, RPQ’ed to 2400 drives, Modular power, 3 Phase Power

Some models sold as DMX-4 1500, DMX-4 2500, DMX-4 3500 and DMX-4 4500

To read about a blog post on EMC Symmetrix: DMX4 Components

To read about differences between EMC Symmetrix DMX3 and DMX4 platforms

To read about different drives types supported on EMC Symmetrix DMX4 Platform

To read about differences between EMC Symmetrix DMX4 and V-Max Systems

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Symmetrix V-Max

(Released April 2009)

Enginuity Microcode 5874.xxx.xxx

Total number of drives supported: 2400

Total Cache: 1 TB mirrored (512GB usable)

Total Storage: 2 PB

All features on the V-Max have been discussed earlier on the blog post linked below

Symmetrix V-Max SE: Single System Bay, SE=Single Engine, Storage Bay x 2, 360 drives max, cannot be expanded to a full blown 8 engine system if purchased as a SE, 3 Phase power, Modular Power

Symmetrix V-Max: System Cabinet, Storage Bay x 10, 2400 drives max, modular power, 3 phase power

To read about differences between EMC Symmetrix DMX4 and V-Max Systems

To read about different drives types supported on EMC Symmetrix V-Max Platforms

To read all about the EMC Symmetrix V-Max Platform

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I could have easily added total memory capacity per frame, total number of dedicated DA/DAF slots, total slots, total universal slots, total memory slots, but then I didn’t know information on some of the old systems and didn’t want to be incorrect on them.

Hope you have enjoyed reading this post, with a bit of history related to the Symmetrix platform. I am pretty positive, as of today you will not find this consolidated information on any blog or the manufacturers website.

I really wish, EMC decided to open blogging to some Symmetrix, Clariion, Celerra, Centera specialist that support these systems on a day to day basis, the information that could come out from those guys could be phenomenal. Barry Burke writes a lot of stuff, but again a lot of FUD from him against IBM and HDS, its great reading him, but only a controlled amount of technical information comes from him.

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