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EMC Symmetrix DMX-4: Supported Drive Types

June 28th, 2009 No comments

In this blog post we will discuss the supported drive models for EMC Symmetrix DMX-4. Right before the release of Symmetrix V-Max systems, in early Feb 2009 we saw some added support for EFD’s (Enterprise Flash Disk) on the Symmetrix DMX-4 platform. The additions were denser 200GB and 400GB EFD’s.

The following size drives types are supported with Symmetrix DMX-4 Systems at the current microcode 5773: 73GB, 146GB, 200GB, 300GB, 400GB, 450GB, 500GB, 1000GB. Flavors of drives include 10K or 15K and interface varies 2GB or 4GB.
The drive has capabilities to auto negotiate to the backplane speed. If the drive LED is green the speed is 2GB, if its neon blue its 4GB interface.

To read a blog post on supported drive types on EMC Symmetrix V-Max System

The following are details on the drives for the Symmetrix DMX-4 Systems. You will find details around Drive Types, Rotational Speed, Interface, Device Cache, Access times, Raw Capacity, Open Systems Formatted Capacity and Mainframe Formatted Capacity.


73GB FC Drive

Drive Speed: 10K

Interface: 2GB / 4GB

Device Cache: 16MB

Access speed: 4.7 – 5.4 mS

Raw Capacity: 73.41 GB

Open Systems Formatted Cap: 68.30 GB

Mainframe Formatted Cap: 72.40 GB

73GB FC Drive

Drive Speed: 15K

Interface: 2GB / 4GB

Device Cache: 16MB

Access speed: 3.5 – 4.0 mS

Raw Capacity: 73.41 GB

Open Systems Formatted Cap: 68.30 GB

Mainframe Formatted Cap: 72.40 GB

146GB FC Drive

Drive Speed: 10K

Interface: 2GB / 4GB

Device Cache: 32MB

Access speed: 4.7 – 5.4 mS

Raw Capacity: 146.82 GB

Open Systems Formatted Cap: 136.62 GB

Mainframe Formatted Cap: 144.81 GB

146GB FC Drive

Drive Speed: 15K

Interface: 2GB / 4GB

Device Cache: 32MB

Access speed: 3.5 – 4.0 mS

Raw Capacity: 146.82 GB

Open Systems Formatted Cap: 136.62 GB

Mainframe Formatted Cap: 144.81 GB

300GB FC Drive

Drive Speed: 10K

Interface: 2GB / 4GB

Device Cache: 32MB

Access speed: 4.7 – 5.4 mS

Raw Capacity: 300.0 GB

Open Systems Formatted Cap: 279.17 GB

Mainframe Formatted Cap: 295.91 GB

300GB FC Drive

Drive Speed: 15K

Interface: 2GB / 4GB

Device Cache: 32MB

Access speed: 3.6 – 4.1 mS

Raw Capacity: 300.0 GB

Open Systems Formatted Cap: 279.17 GB

Mainframe Formatted Cap: 295.91 GB

400GB FC Drive

Drive Speed: 10K

Interface: 2GB / 4GB

Device Cache: 16MB

Access speed: 3.9 – 4.2 mS

Raw Capacity: 400.0 GB

Open Systems Formatted Cap: 372.23 GB

Mainframe Formatted Cap: 394.55 GB

450GB FC Drive

Drive Speed: 15K

Interface: 2GB / 4GB

Device Cache: 16MB

Access speed: 3.4 – 4.1 mS

Raw Capacity: 450.0 GB

Open Systems Formatted Cap: 418.76 GB

Mainframe Formatted Cap: 443.87 GB

500GB SATA II Drive

Drive Speed: 7.2K

Interface: 2GB / 4GB

Device Cache: 32MB

Access speed: 8.5 to 9.5 mS

Raw Capacity: 500.0 GB

Open Systems Formatted Cap: 465.29 GB

Mainframe Formatted Cap: 493.19 GB

1000GB SATA II Drive

Drive Speed: 7.2K

Interface: 2GB / 4GB

Device Cache: 32MB

Access speed: 8.2 – 9.2 mS

Raw Capacity: 1000.0 GB

Open Systems Formatted Cap: 930.78 GB

Mainframe Formatted Cap: 986.58 GB

73GB EFD

Drive Speed: Not Applicable

Interface: 2GB

Device Cache: Not Applicable

Access speed: 1mS

Raw Capacity: 73.0 GB

Open Systems Formatted Cap: 73.0 GB

Mainframe Formatted Cap: 73.0 GB

146GB EFD

Drive Speed: Not Applicable

Interface: 2GB

Device Cache: Not Applicable

Access speed: 1mS

Raw Capacity: 146.0 GB

Open Systems Formatted Cap: 146.0 GB

Mainframe Formatted Cap: 146.0 GB

200GB EFD

Drive Speed: Not Applicable

Interface: 2GB / 4GB

Device Cache: Not Applicable

Access speed: 1mS

Raw Capacity: 200 GB

Open Systems Formatted Cap: 196.97 GB

Mainframe Formatted Cap: 191.21 GB

400GB EFD

Drive Speed: Not Applicable

Interface: 2GB / 4GB

Device Cache: Not Applicable

Access speed: 1mS

Raw Capacity: 400.0 GB

Open Systems Formatted Cap: 393.84 GB

Mainframe Formatted Cap: 382.33 GB

Support for 73GB and 146GB EFD’s have been dropped with the Symmetrix V-Max Systems, they will still be supported with the Symmetrix DMX-4 Systems which in addition to 73 GB and 146GB also supports 200GB and 400GB EFD’s.

EMC Symmetrix V-Max: Enginuity 5874

June 26th, 2009 1 comment

EMC Symmetrix V-Max systems were introduced back in the month of April 2009. With this new generation of Symmetrix came a new name V-Max and a new Enginuity family of microcode 5874.
To read about Symmetrix on StorageNerve Blog

http://storagenerve.com/tag/symmetrix

To read about V-Max systems on StorageNerve Blog

http://storagenerve.com/tag/v-max/

With this family of microcode 5874: there are 7 major areas of enhancements as listed below.

Base enhancements

Management Interfaces enhancements

SRDF functionality changes

Timefinder Performance enhancements

Open Replicator Support and enhancements

Virtualization enhancements

Also EMC introduced SMC 7.0 (Symmetrix Management Console) for managing this generation of Symmetrix. Read about the SMC 7.0 post below.

http://storagenerve.com/2009/05/06/emc-symmetrix-management-console-symmetrix-v-max-systems/

With Enginuity family 5874 you also need solutions enabler 7.0

The initial Enginuity was release 5874.121.102, a month into the release we saw a new emulation and SP release 5874.122.103 and the latest release as of 18th of June 2009 is 5874.123.104. With these new emulation and SP releases, there aren’t any new features added to the microcode rather just some patches and fixes related to the maintenance, DU/DL and environmentals.

Based on some initial list of enhancements by EMC and then a few we heard at EMC World 2009, to sum up, here are all of those.

RVA: Raid Virtual Architecture:

With Enginuity 5874 EMC introduced the concept of single mirror positions. Normally it has always been challenging to reduce the mirror positions since they cap out at 4. With enhancements to mirror positions related to SRDF environments and RAID 5 (3D + 1P, 7D +1P) / RAID 6  (6D+2P, 14D+2P) / RAID 1 devices, now it will open doors to some further migration and data movement opportunities related to SRDF and RAID devices.

Large Volume Support:

With this version of Enginuity, we will see max volume size of 240GB for open systems and 223GB for mainframe systems with 512 hypers per drive. The maximum drive size supported on Symmetrix V-Max system is 1TB SATA II drives. The maximum drive size supported for EFD on a Symmetrix V-Max system is 400GB.

Dynamic Provisioning:

Enhancements related to SRDF and BCV device attributes will overall improve efficiency during configuration management. Will provide methods and means for faster provisioning.

Concurrent Configuration Changes:

Enhancements to concurrent configuration changes will allow the customer and customer engineer to perform through Service Processor and through Solutions enabler certain procedures and changes that can be all combined and executed through a single script rather than running them in a series of changes.

Service Processor IP Interface:

All Service Processors attached to the Symmetrix V-Max systems will have Symmetrix Management Console 7.0 on it, that will allow customers to login and perform Symmetrix related management functions. Also the service processor will have capabilities to be managed through the customer’s current IP (network) environment. Symmetrix Management Console will have to be licensed and purchased from EMC for V-Max systems. The prior versions of SMC were free. SMC will now have capabilities to be opened through a web interface.

SRDF Enhancements:

With introduction of RAID 5 and RAID 6 devices on the previous generation of Symmetrix (DMX-4), now the V-Max offers a 300% better performance with TImefinder and other SRDF layered apps to make the process very efficient and resilient.

Enhanced Virtual LUN Technology:

Enhancements related to Virtual LUN Technology will allow customers to non-disruptively perform changes to the location of disk either physically or logically and further simplify the process of migration on various systems.

Virtual Provisioning:

Virtual Provisioning can now be pushed to RAID 5 and RAID 6 devices that were restrictive in the previous versions of Symmetrix.

Autoprovisioning Groups:

Using Autoprovisiong groups, customers will now be able to perform device masking by creating host initiators, front-end ports and storage volumes. There was an EMC Challenge at EMC World 2009 Symmetrix corner for auto provisioning the symms with a minimum number of clicks. Autoprovisioning groups are supported through Symmetrix Management Console.

So the above are the highlights of EMC Symmetrix V-Max Enginuity 5874. As new version of the microcode is released later in the year stay plugged in for more info.

EMC Symmetrix V-Max: Supported drive types

June 25th, 2009 No comments

With the release of EMC Symmetrix V-Max systems, EMC introduced higher density EFD’s (Enterprise Flash Disks) than being supported on its predecessor, the EMC Symmetrix DMX-4.

Below are some stats related to the supported drive types on a Symmetrix V-Max system with 5874.123.104 microcode.

Possibly with introduction of FAST (Fully Automated Storage Tiering) later in the year we will see an upgrade to the microcode family for the V-Max systems to 5976, also with that expect a much denser EFD support.

In the mean time we should atleast see some additional support for VSphere 4.0 (Vmware) in 2009 with 5875 family of microcode. With that we should see sort of a new concept of Federation with Symmetrix V-Max Systems where EMC might give some clues on how the 8 engine systems might be expanded into either 16 or 32 engine systems. A nice blog post by @edsai on the breathing data site. http://breathingdata.com/?p=20

The following size drives types are supported with Symmetrix V-Max Systems at the current microcode 5874: 146 GB, 200 GB, 300 GB, 400 GB, 450 GB, 1000 GB.


Drive Types, Rotational Speed and Formatted Capacity


146 GB FC Drive

Drive Speed: 15K

Open Systems Format Cap: 143.53 GB

Mainframe Format Cap: 139.34 GB

300 GB FC Drive

Drive Speed: 15K

Open Systems Format Cap: 288.19 GB

Mainframe Format Cap: 279.77 GB

400 GB FC Drive

Drive Speed: 10K

Open Systems Format Cap: 393.84 GB

Mainframe Format Cap: 382.32 GB

450 GB FC Drive

Drive Speed: 15K

Open Systems Format Cap: 432.29 GB

Mainframe Format Cap: 419.64 GB

1000 GB SATA II Drive

Drive Speed: 7.2K

Open Systems Format Cap: 984.81 GB

Mainframe Format Cap: 956.02 GB

200 GB EFD

Drive Speed: Not Applicable

Open Systems Format Cap: 196.97 GB

Mainframe Format Cap: 191.21 GB

400 GB EFD

Drive Speed: Not Applicable

Open Systems Format Cap: 393.84 GB

Mainframe Format Cap: 382.33 GB

Support for 73GB and 146GB EFD’s have been dropped with the Symmetrix V-Max Systems, they will still be supported with the Symmetrix DMX-4 Systems which in addition to 73 GB and 146GB also supports 200GB and 400GB EFD’s.

EMC Symmetrix DMX device type, COVD: Cache Only Virtual Device

June 25th, 2009 No comments

On Twitter this morning we (@chrismevans@basraayman@davegraham) were discussing device type: COVD (Cache Only Virtual Device) on EMC Symmetrix DMX platform.

So here is some information on Cache Only Virtual Devices. I do not have a very clear picture on the overall operation of this device type, but from a high level it can be summed up as following based on it characteristics.

Starting with microcode 5670 on EMC Symmetrix DMX Systems, EMC introduced COVD (device types). We have seen instances of COVD on 5671, 5771 and 5772 microcodes, really unknown if they exist on EMC Symmetrix V-Max systems at this point.

Here are some highlights on COVD:

  • Even though COVD’s were introduced on the 5670 microcode, recommendation is to upgrade to 5671 on the R2 side of SRDF/A before implementing COVD’s.
  • Used with SRDF/A technology for caching data on R2 side.
  • Symconfigure will not allow (block) you to change SRDF/A group on R2 side for COVD devices. You will need a BIN File change for this process by the Customer Engineer.
  • COVD is a Virtual Device but does end up taking two device numbers within your list of Symmetrix device numbers (I believe 8192 device numbers are available on the early DMX’s).
  • If you are using COVD, your configured capacity might show more than your Raw Capacity in ECC and StorageScope.
  • COVD’s cannot be snapped using TImefinder
  • COVD’s can only be created and destroyed by BIN File (not through SYMCLI)
  • COVD is only found on R2 side of SRDF/A
  • Cache is used as part of creating the COVD
  • COVD’s are used in pairs, one is used for active SRDF/A cycle and 1 is used for inactive SRDF/A cycle
  • No Data is stored on COVD, used practically for caching
  • Primarily introduction of COVD was to reduce the write pending limits with SRDF/A

Haven’t really seen a lot of customers using COVD (device types). But sometimes during storage analysis of customer meta data reveals these device types since it is assigned a device number.